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Sugar-sweetened beverages: still cause for concern in New Zealand and Australia

  • Lynne Chepulis (a1), Jason HY Wu (a2) and Gael Mearns (a3)
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1. Rich, K (2018) Comment on: ‘The nutritional content of supermarket beverages: a cross-sectional analysis of New Zealand, Australia, Canada and the UK’ by Chepulis et al. (Letter to the Editor). Public Health Nutr. Published online: 11 June 2018. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980018001271.
2. Chepulis, L, Mearns, G, Hill, S et al. (2018) The nutritional content of supermarket beverages: a cross-sectional analysis of New Zealand, Australia, Canada and the UK. Public Health Nutrition. Published online: 7 February 2018. doi: 10.1017/S1368980017004128.
3. Levy, GS & Shrapnel, WS (2014) Quenching Australia’s thirst: a trend analysis of water‐based beverage sales from 1997 to 2011. Nutr Diet 71, 193200.
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5. Singh, GM, Micha, R, Khatibzadeh, S et al. Global Burden of Diseases Nutrition and Chronic Diseases Expert Group (2015) Global, regional, and national consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, fruit juices, and milk: a systematic assessment of beverage intake in 187 countries. PLoS One 10, e0124845.
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8. New South Wales Government (2017) Healthy Food and Drink in NSW Health Facilities for Staff and Visitors Framework. http://www1.health.nsw.gov.au/pds/ActivePDSDocuments/GL2017_012.pdf (accessed April 2018).
9. New South Wales Department of Education (2011) Nutrition in Schools Policy. https://education.nsw.gov.au/policy-library/policies/nutrition-in-schools-policy (accessed April 2018).
10. Canterbury District Health Board (2017) Water-only Schools Toolkit. https://www.cph.co.nz/wp-content/uploads/wateronlyschoolstoolkit.pdf (accessed April 2018).
11. Boelsen-Robinson, T, Backholer, K, Corben, K et al. (2017) The effect of a change to healthy vending in a major Australian health service on sales of healthy and unhealthy food and beverages. Appetite 114, 7381.
12. Olstad, DL, Goonewardene, LA, McCargar, LJ et al. (2015) If we offer it, will children buy it? Sales of healthy foods mirrored their availability in a community sport, commercial setting in Alberta, Canada. Child Obes 11, 156164.
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16. Hsiao, A & Wang, YC (2013) Reducing sugar-sweetened beverage consumption: evidence, policies, and economics. Curr Obes Rep 2, 191199.
17. Cobiac, LJ, Tam, K, Veerman, L et al. (2017) Taxes and subsidies for improving diet and population health in Australia: a cost-effectiveness modelling study. PLoS Med 14, e1002232.
18. Crino, M, Herrera, AM, Ananthapavan, J et al. (2017) Modelled cost-effectiveness of a package size cap and a kilojoule reduction intervention to reduce energy intake from sugar-sweetened beverages in Australia. Nutrients 9, 983.
19. Chepulis, L, Mearns, G, Hill, S et al. (2018) The nutritional content of supermarket beverages: a cross-sectional analysis of New Zealand, Australia, Canada and the UK – CORRIGENDUM. Public Health Nutr. Published online: 6 April 2018. doi: 10.1017/S1368980018000794.

Sugar-sweetened beverages: still cause for concern in New Zealand and Australia

  • Lynne Chepulis (a1), Jason HY Wu (a2) and Gael Mearns (a3)

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