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Speed of eating and 3-year BMI change: a nationwide prospective study of mid-age women

  • Sook Ling Leong (a1), Andrew Gray (a2) and Caroline C Horwath (a1)

Abstract

Objective

To conduct the first nationwide population survey to examine the associations between changes in speed of eating and weight gain over 3 years. The study also explored whether faster eating at baseline was related to healthy-weight women becoming overweight after 3 years.

Design

Longitudinal. At baseline, participants were randomly selected from a nationally representative sampling frame to participate in a prospective study. Women completed self-administered baseline questionnaires on demographic and health measures. Self-reported speed of eating, smoking status, physical activity, menopause status, and height and weight were collected at baseline and again 3 years later.

Setting

Nationwide study, New Zealand.

Subjects

Women (n 1601) aged 40–50 years were recruited at baseline from New Zealand electoral rolls.

Results

There was no evidence of associations between 3-year BMI adjusting for baseline BMI and either baseline speed of eating (slower and faster; P=0·524) or change in speed of eating (consistently faster eating, consistently slower eating, slower eating at baseline but not at 3 years, faster eating at baseline but not at 3 years; P=0·845). Of the 488 women with healthy BMI (18·5 to <25·0 kg/m2) at baseline, seventy-seven (15·8 %) became overweight (BMI≥25·0 kg/m2) after 3 years. Compared with those who were slower eaters at baseline, faster eating at baseline did not increase the risk of becoming overweight 3 years later (P=0·958) nor did change in speed of eating (P=0·236).

Conclusions

Results suggest that once women have reached mid-life, faster eating does not predict further weight gain.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Email caroline.horwath@otago.ac.nz

References

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