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Socio-economic differentials in minimum dietary diversity among young children in South-East Asia: evidence from Demographic and Health Surveys

  • Chloe M Harvey (a1), Marie-Louise Newell (a2) and Sabu S Padmadas (a1)

Abstract

Objective

To investigate the socio-economic differentials underlying minimum dietary diversity (MDD) among children aged 6–23 months in three economically diverse South-East Asian countries.

Design

The outcome variable MDD was defined as the proportion of children aged 6–23 months who received foods from four of the seven recommended food groups within the 24 h prior to interview. The association between socio-economic factors and MDD, adjusting for relevant characteristics, was examined using logistic regression.

Setting

We used cross-sectional population data from recent Demographic and Health Surveys from Cambodia (2014), Myanmar (2015–16) and Indonesia (2012).

Subjects

Total of 8364 children aged 6–23 months.

Results

Approximately half of all children met the MDD, varying from 47·7 % in Cambodia (n 1023) to 58·2 % in Indonesia (n 2907) and 24·6 % in Myanmar (n 301). The likelihood (adjusted OR; 95 % CI) of meeting MDD increased for children in the richest households (Cambodia: 2·4; 1·7, 3·4; Myanmar: 1·8; 1·1, 3·0; Indonesia: 2·0; 1·6, 2·5) and those residing in urban areas (Cambodia: 1·4; 1·1, 1·9; Myanmar: 1·7; 1·2, 2·4; Indonesia: 1·7; 1·5, 1·9). MDD deprivation was most severe among children from the poorest households in rural areas. The association between mother’s labour force participation and MDD was positive in all three countries but reached significance only in Indonesia (1·3; 1·1, 1·5).

Conclusions

MDD deprivation among young children was significantly high in socio-economically disadvantaged families in all three study settings. MDD requirements are not being met for approximately half of young children in these three South-East Asian countries.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email C.M.Harvey@soton.ac.uk

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Socio-economic differentials in minimum dietary diversity among young children in South-East Asia: evidence from Demographic and Health Surveys

  • Chloe M Harvey (a1), Marie-Louise Newell (a2) and Sabu S Padmadas (a1)

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