Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Small, medium, large or supersize: trends in food portion sizes in The Netherlands

  • Ingrid HM Steenhuis (a1), Franca H Leeuwis (a1) and Willemijn M Vermeer (a1)

Abstract

Objective

Larger food portion sizes lead to increased energy intake levels and might contribute to the current obesity epidemic. Only a very limited number of studies are available on the actual development of food portion sizes during past decades. The present study aims to reveal trends in portion sizes of some high-energy-dense food products during recent decades in The Netherlands.

Design

The data were collected from manufacturers and from information found in professional journals, marketing and advertising materials, and on manufacturers’ websites.

Results

A number of trends in food portion sizes were observed. Larger sizes have been added to the portion size portfolio. The portion sizes of a number of products have also increased since their introduction, although this did not apply to all the products included. Finally, multi-packs have been introduced and the number of products within a multi-pack has also increased.

Conclusions

A trend towards larger portion sizes was observed, which is relevant to the public health debate regarding the prevention of overweight and obesity. It is recommended that developments in food portion sizes continue to be monitored over the coming years, and the effects of the newly introduced portion sizes on food intake be studied.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Small, medium, large or supersize: trends in food portion sizes in The Netherlands
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Small, medium, large or supersize: trends in food portion sizes in The Netherlands
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Small, medium, large or supersize: trends in food portion sizes in The Netherlands
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email Ingrid.steenhuis@falw.vu.nl

References

Hide All
1. Swinburn, B, Eggar, G & Raza, F (1999) Dissecting obesogenic environments: the development and application of a frame work for identifying and prioritizing environmental interventions for obesity. Prev Med 29, 563570.
2. Matthiessen, J, Fagt, S, Biltoft-Jensen, A et al. (2003) Size makes a difference. Public Health Nutr 6, 6572.
3. Nielsen, SJ & Popkin, BM (2003) Patterns and trends in food portion sizes, 1977–1998. JAMA 289, 450453.
4. Smiciklas-Wright, H, Mitchell, DC, Mickle, SJ et al. (2003) Foods commonly eaten in the United States, 1989–1991 and 1994–1996: are portion sizes changing? J Am Diet Assoc 103, 4147.
5. Young, LR & Nestle, M (2002) The contribution of expanding portion sizes to the US obesity epidemic. Am J Public Health 92, 246249.
6. Steenhuis, IHM & Vermeer, WM (2009) Portion size. Review and framework for interventions. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act 6, 58.
7. Dilliberti, N, Bordi, PL, Conklin, MT et al. (2004) Increased portion size leads to increased energy intake in a restaurant meal. Obes Res 12, 562568.
8. Raynor, HA & Wing, RR (2007) Package unit and amount of food: do both influence intake? Obesity (Silver Spring) 15, 23112319.
9. Rolls, BJ, Morris, EL & Roe, LS (2002) Portion size of food affects energy intake in normal-weight and overweight men and women. Am J Clin Nutr 76, 12071213.
10. Rolls, BJ, Roe, LS, Meengs, JS et al. (2004) Increasing the portion size of a sandwich increases energy intake. J Am Diet Assoc 104, 367372.
11. Wansink, B & Park, SB (2001) At the movies: how external cues and perceived taste impact consumption volume. Food Qual Prefer 12, 6974.
12. Wansink, B & Kim, J (2005) Bad popcorn in big buckets: portion size can influence intake as much as taste. J Nutr Educ Behav 37, 242245.
13. Wansink, B, Painter, JE & North, J (2005) Bottomless bowls: why visual cues of portion size may influence intake. Obes Res 13, 93100.
14. Rolls, BJ, Roe, LS, Kral, TVE et al. (2004) Increasing the portion size of a packaged snack increases energy intake in men and women. Appetite 42, 6369.
15. Flood, JE, Roe, LS & Rolls, BJ (2006) The effects of increased beverage portion size on energy intake at a meal. J Am Diet Assoc 106, 19841990.
16. Rolls, BJ, Roe, LS & Meengs, JS (2006) Larger portion sizes lead to sustained increase in energy intake over 2 days. J Am Diet Assoc 106, 543549.
17. Rolls, BJ, Roe, LS & Meengs, JS (2007) The effect of large portion sizes on energy intake is sustained for 11 days. Obesity (Silver Spring) 15, 15351543.
18. Young, LR & Nestle, M (2007) Portion sizes and obesity: responses of fast-food companies. J Public Health Policy 28, 238248.
19. Wrieden, W, Gregor, A & Barton, K (2008) Have food portion sizes increased in the UK over the last 20 years? Proc Nutr Soc 67, E211.
20. Rozin, P, Kabnick, K, Pete, E et al. (2003) The ecology of eating: smaller portion sizes in France than in the United States help explain the French paradox. Psychol Sci 14, 450454.
21. Bijman, J, Pronk, B & de Graaff, R (2003) Wie voedt Nederland? Consumenten en aanbieders van voedingsmiddelen (Who Feeds the Netherlands? Consumers and Suppliers of Food Products). Den-Haag: LEI.
22. French, SA (2003) Pricing effects on food choices. J Nutr 133, 841S843S.
23. Wansink, B (1996) Can package size accelerate usage volume? J Mark 60, 114.
24. Wansink, B (2004) Environmental factors that increase the food intake and consumption volume of unknowing consumers. Annu Rev Nutr 24, 455479.
25. Coelho do Vale, R, Pieters, R & Zeelenberg, M (2008) Flying under the radar: perverse package size effects on consumption self regulation. J Consum Res 35, 380390.
26. Taylor Quilliam, E (2006) Mega, monster or misplaced; do portion size brand extensions meet consumer needs? J Consum Mark 23, 123124.

Keywords

Small, medium, large or supersize: trends in food portion sizes in The Netherlands

  • Ingrid HM Steenhuis (a1), Franca H Leeuwis (a1) and Willemijn M Vermeer (a1)

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed