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School – a multitude of opportunities for promoting healthier eating

  • Bent Egberg Mikkelsen (a1)
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2. Nordic Council of Ministers (2006) A Better Life through Diet and Physical Activity. Nordic Action Plan on Better Health and Quality of Life through Diet and Physical Activity. Copenhagen: Nordic Council of Ministers; available at http://www.norden.org/en/publications/publikationer/2006-746/at_download/publicationfile
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5. World Food Programme (2013) State of School Feeding Worldwide 2013. Rome: WPF; available at http://documents.wfp.org/stellent/groups/public/documents/communications/wfp257481.pdf
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10. Faber, M, Laurie, S, Maduna, M et al. (2014) Is the school food environment conducive to healthy eating in poorly resourced South African schools? Public Health Nutr 17, 1214–1223.
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25. Nussbaum, MC & Sen, A (editors) (1993) The Quality of Life. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

School – a multitude of opportunities for promoting healthier eating

  • Bent Egberg Mikkelsen (a1)

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