Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Rapid acceptability and adherence testing of a lipid-based nutrient supplement and a micronutrient powder among refugee children and pregnant and lactating women in Algeria

  • Melody C Tondeur (a1), U Núria Salse (a2), Caroline Wilkinson (a1), Paul Spiegel (a1) and Andrew J Seal (a3)...

Abstract

Objective

To assess the acceptability and adherence to daily doses of lipid-based nutrient supplement (LNS) among children and micronutrient powder (MNP) among children and pregnant and lactating women.

Design

Household interviews and sachet counting were conducted to measure acceptability and adherence, 15 and 30 d after product distribution. Qualitative information on product acceptability was collected using focus group discussions.

Setting

Saharawi refugee camps, Algeria, August–October 2009.

Subjects

LNS was distributed to 123 children aged 6–35 months (LNS-C), and MNP to 112 children aged 36–59 months (MNP-C) and 119 pregnant or lactating women (MNP-W).

Results

At the end of the test 98·4 % of LNS-C, 90·4 % of MNP-C and 75·5 % of MNP-W participants reported that they liked the product (P<0·05). Other measures of acceptability did not differ. Median consumption of sachets was highest in the LNS-C group (P<0·001). ‘Good’ adherence to the daily regimen (consumption of 75–125 % of recommended dose) was 89·1 % in the LNS-C, compared with 57·0 % in the MNP-C and 65·8 % in the MNP-W groups (P<0·001). Qualitative findings supported the quantitative measures and guided selection of local product names, packaging designs, distribution mechanisms, and the design of the information campaign in the subsequent programme scale-up.

Conclusions

Acceptability, consumption and adherence were higher in participants receiving LNS compared with MNP. However, both products were found to be suitable when compared with predefined acceptability criteria. Acceptability studies are feasible and important in emergency nutrition programmes when the use of novel special nutritional products is considered.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Rapid acceptability and adherence testing of a lipid-based nutrient supplement and a micronutrient powder among refugee children and pregnant and lactating women in Algeria
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Rapid acceptability and adherence testing of a lipid-based nutrient supplement and a micronutrient powder among refugee children and pregnant and lactating women in Algeria
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Rapid acceptability and adherence testing of a lipid-based nutrient supplement and a micronutrient powder among refugee children and pregnant and lactating women in Algeria
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Email a.seal@ucl.ac.uk

References

Hide All
1. World Food Programme, Medicos Del Mundos, Norwegian Church Aid et al . (2008) Nutritional and Food Security Survey among the Saharawi Refugees in Camps in Tindouf, Algeria (October 2008). Saharawi Arab Democratic Republic: Ministry of Health.
2. Lopriore, C, Guidoum, Y, Briend, A et al. (2004) Spread fortified with vitamins and minerals induces catch-up growth and eradicates severe anemia in stunted refugee children aged 3–6 y. Am J Clin Nutr 80, 973981.
3. United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (2008) UNHCR Strategic Plan for Anaemia Prevention, Control and Reduction: Reducing the Global Burden of Anaemia in Refugee Populations 2008–2019. Geneva: UNHCR.
4. Phuka, JC, Maleta, K, Thakwalakwa, C et al. (2009) Postintervention growth of Malawian children who received 12-mo dietary complementation with a lipid-based nutrient supplement or maize–soy flour. Am J Clin Nutr 89, 382390.
5. Phuka, JC, Gladstone, M, Maleta, K et al. (2012) Developmental outcomes among 18-month-old Malawians after a year of complementary feeding with lipid-based nutrient supplements or corn–soy flour. Matern Child Nutr 8, 239248.
6. Adu-Afarwuah, S, Lartey, A, Brown, KH et al. (2007) Randomized comparison of 3 types of micronutrient supplements for home fortification of complementary foods in Ghana: effects on growth and motor development. Am J Clin Nutr 86, 412420.
7. Dewey, KG & Adu-Afarwuah, S (2008) Systematic review of the efficacy and effectiveness of complementary feeding interventions in developing countries. Matern Child Nutr 4, 2485.
8. Tondeur, MC, Schauer, CS, Christofides, AL et al. (2004) Determination of iron absorption from intrinsically labeled microencapsulated ferrous fumarate (sprinkles) in infants with different iron and hematologic status by using a dual-stable-isotope method. Am J Clin Nutr 80, 14361444.
9. Zlotkin, SH, Schauer, C, Owusu Agyei, S et al. (2006) Demonstrating zinc and iron bioavailability from intrinsically labeled microencapsulated ferrous fumarate and zinc gluconate Sprinkles in young children. J Nutr 136, 920925.
10. Dewey, KG, Yang, ZY & Boy, E (2009) Systematic review and meta-analysis of home fortification of complementary foods. Matern Child Nutr 5, 283321.
11. Khan, E, Hyder, SMZ, Tondeur, MC et al. (2006) Home fortification with Sprinkles to reduce childhood anaemia: lessons learned in North West Frontier Province, Pakistan. Pak J Med Res 45, 3540.
12. Adu-Afarwuah, S, Lartey, A, Zeilani, M et al. (2011) Acceptability of lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) among Ghanaian infants and pregnant or lactating women. Matern Child Nutr 7, 344356.
13. Hess, SY, Bado, L, Aaron, GJ et al. (2011) Acceptability of zinc-fortified, lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) prepared for young children in Burkina Faso. Matern Child Nutr 7, 357367.
14. Abbeddou, S, Hess, S, Jimenez, EY et al. (2014) Adherence to small-quantity lipid based nutrient supplement among young Burkinabe children. FASEB J 28, 1.
15. Phuka, J, Ashorn, U, Ashorn, P et al. (2011) Acceptability of three novel lipid-based nutrient supplements among Malawian infants and their caregivers. Matern Child Nutr 7, 368377.
16. Kodish, S, Rah, JH, Kraemer, K et al. (2011) Understanding low usage of micronutrient powder in the Kakuma Refugee Camp, Kenya: findings from a qualitative study. Food Nutr Bull 32, 292303.
17. Tripp, K, Mackeith, N, Woodruff, BA et al. (2010) Acceptability and use of iron and iron-alloy cooking pots: implications for anaemia control programmes. Public Health Nutr 13, 123130.
18. United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees & World Food Programme (2009) UNHCR–WFP Joint Assessment Mission Assistance to Refugees from Western Sahara, Algeria, 27 September to 9 October 2009. Geneva: UNHCR.
19. Seal, AJ, Creeke, PI, Gnat, D et al. (2006) Excess dietary iodine intake in long-term African refugees. Public Health Nutr 9, 3539.
20. Saharawi Ministry of Health, Norwegian Church Aid & Akershus University College (2008) Prevalence of Goitre and Evaluation of Food Intake among Saharawi Refugees in Camps in Tindouf, Algeria. Saharawi Arab Democratic Republic: Ministry of Health.
21. Ashorn, U, Alho, L, Arimond, M et al. (2015) Malawian mothers consider lipid-based nutrient supplements acceptable for children throughout a 1-year intervention, but deviation from user recommendations is common. J Nutr 145, 15881595.
22. Christofides, A, Asante, KP, Schauer, C et al. (2006) Multi-micronutrient Sprinkles including a low dose of iron provided as microencapsulated ferrous fumarate improves haematologic indices in anaemic children: a randomized clinical trial. Matern Child Nutr 2, 169180.
23. Dewey, KG & Adu-Afarwuah, S (2008) Systematic review of the efficacy and effectiveness of complementary feeding interventions in developing countries. Matern Child Nutr 4, Suppl. 1, 2485.
24. Jefferds, ME, Ogange, L, Owuor, M et al. (2010) Formative research exploring acceptability, utilization, and promotion in order to develop a micronutrient powder (Sprinkles) intervention among Luo families in western Kenya. Food Nutr Bull 31, 2 Suppl., S179S185.
25. Tripp, K, Perrine, CG, de Campos, P et al. (2011) Formative research for the development of a market-based home fortification programme for young children in Niger. Matern Child Nutr 7, Suppl. 3, 8295.
26. Henjum, S, Barikmo, I, Gjerlaug, AK et al. (2010) Endemic goitre and excessive iodine in urine and drinking water among Saharawi refugee children. Public Health Nutr 13, 14721477.
27. Style, S, Tondeur, M, Wilkinson, C et al. (2013) Operational guidance on the use of special nutritional products in refugee populations. Food Nutr Bull 34, 420428.

Keywords

Rapid acceptability and adherence testing of a lipid-based nutrient supplement and a micronutrient powder among refugee children and pregnant and lactating women in Algeria

  • Melody C Tondeur (a1), U Núria Salse (a2), Caroline Wilkinson (a1), Paul Spiegel (a1) and Andrew J Seal (a3)...

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed