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Predicting percentage of individuals consuming foods from percentage of households purchasing foods to improve the use of household budget surveys in estimating food chemical intakes

  • Joyce Lambe (a1), John Kearney (a1), Wulf Becker (a2), Karin Hulshof (a3), Adrian Dunne (a4) and Michael J Gibney (a1)...

Abstract

Objective:

To examine the hypothesis that there is sufficient agreement between percentage of households purchasing selected foods using household budget surveys and percentage of individuals consuming these foods as determined in individual-based surveys to allow the former to act as a surrogate for the latter when estimating food chemical intakes using household budget data.

Design:

Database study.

Setting:

Databases from Sweden, The Netherlands, Ireland and the UK.

Subjects:

319 foods (Sweden n=60, The Netherlands n=80, Ireland n=90, UK n=89).

Results:

Pearson correlations demonstrated a high degree of linear association between % households purchasing and % consumers (r=0.86). Regression analysis defined a close positive relationship between the two datasets (slope 0.95, intercept +2.74). Across countries, using the regression equation, the % households predicted % consumers to within 5% of the true value for between 33 and 48% of foods and to within 10% for between 53 and 78% of foods.

Conclusions:

Values for % households can be used as a crude surrogate for % consumers and can thus play a role in improving estimates of food additive intake.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: E-mail iefs@iefs.ie

References

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Predicting percentage of individuals consuming foods from percentage of households purchasing foods to improve the use of household budget surveys in estimating food chemical intakes

  • Joyce Lambe (a1), John Kearney (a1), Wulf Becker (a2), Karin Hulshof (a3), Adrian Dunne (a4) and Michael J Gibney (a1)...

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