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Nutrition of infants and young children

  • Agneta Yngve (a1), Marilyn Tseng (a2), Irja Haapala (a2) and Allison Hodge (a2)
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References

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1.de Onis, M, Onyango, A, Borghi, E et al. (2012) Worldwide implementation of the WHO Child Growth Standards. Public Health Nutr 15, 16031610.
2.Bayer, O, Jarczok, M, Fischer, J et al. (2012) Validation and extension of a simple questionnaire to assess physical activity in pre-school children. Public Health Nutr 15, 16111619.
3.Rohner, F, Tschannen, AB, Northrop-Clewes, C et al. (2012) Comparison of a possession score and a poverty index in predicting anaemia and undernutrition in pre-school children and women of reproductive age in rural and urban Cote d'Ivoire. Public Health Nutr 15, 16201629.
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7.McAfee, AJ, Mulhern, MS, McSorley, EM et al. (2012) Intakes and adequacy of potentially important nutrients for cognitive development among 5-year-old children in the Seychelles Child Development and Nutrition Study. Public Health Nutr 15, 16701677.
8.Chatzi, L, Papadopoulou, E, Koutra, K et al. (2012) Effect of high doses of folic acid supplementation in early pregnancy on child neurodevelopment at 18 months of age: the mother–child cohort ‘Rhea’ study in Crete, Greece. Public Health Nutr 15, 17281736.
9.Zongrone, A, Winskell, K & Menon, P (2012) Infant and young child feeding practices and child undernutrition in Bangladesh: insights from nationally representative data. Public Health Nutr 15, 16971704.
10.Masibo, PK & Makoka, D (2012) Trends and determinants of undernutrition among young Kenyan children: Kenya Demographic and Health Survey; 1993, 1998, 2003 and 2008–2009. Public Health Nutr 15, 17151727.
11.Fenn, B, Bulti, AT, Nduna, T et al. (2012) An evaluation of an operations research project to reduce childhood stunting in a food-insecure area in Ethiopia. Public Health Nutr 15, 17461754.
12.Thakwalakwa, CM, Ashorn, P, Jawati, M et al. (2012) An effectiveness trial showed lipid-based nutrient supplementation but not corn–soya blend offered a modest benefit in weight gain among 6- to 18-month-old underweight children in rural Malawi. Public Health Nutr 15, 17551762.
13.Abdul-Razzak, KK, Khoursheed, AM, Altawalbeh, SM et al. (2012) Hb level in relation to vitamin D status in healthy infants and toddlers. Public Health Nutr 15, 16831687.
14.Hotz, C, Chileshe, J, Siamusantu, W et al. (2012) Vitamin A intake and infection are associated with plasma retinol among pre-school children in rural Zambia. Public Health Nutr 15, 16881696.
15.De Coen, V, De Bourdeaudhuij, I, Vereecken, C et al. (2012) Effects of a 2-year healthy eating and physical activity intervention for 3–6-year-olds in communities of high and low socio-economic status: the POP (Prevention of Overweight among Pre-school and school children) project. Public Health Nutr 15, 17371745.
16.Ayala, GX, Laska, MN, Zenk, SN et al. (2012) Stocking characteristics and perceived increases in sales among small food store managers/owners associated with the introduction of new food products approved by the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children. Public Health Nutr 15, 17711779.
17.Mehta, K, Phillips, C, Ward, P et al. (2012) Marketing foods to children through product packaging: prolific, unhealthy and misleading. Public Health Nutr 15, 17631770.

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