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Meat consumption in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohorts: results from 24-hour dietary recalls

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2007

J Linseisen
Affiliation:
Unit of Human Nutrition and Cancer Prevention, Technical University of Munich, Alte Akademie 16, D-85405 Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany Division of Clinical Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Centre, Heidelberg, Germany
E Kesse
Affiliation:
INSERM, E3N–EPIC Group, Institute Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France
N Slimani
Affiliation:
Unit of Nutrition, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France
HB Bueno-de-Mesquita
Affiliation:
Department of Chronic Diseases Epidemiology, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands
MC Ocké
Affiliation:
Department of Chronic Diseases Epidemiology, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands
G Skeie
Affiliation:
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway
M Kumle
Affiliation:
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway
M Dorronsoro Iraeta
Affiliation:
Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, Department of Health of the Basque Government, San Sebastian, Spain
P Morote Gómez
Affiliation:
Public Health Directorate, Health Council and Health Services Asturias, Oviedo, Spain
L Janzon
Affiliation:
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden
P Stattin
Affiliation:
Department of Urology and Andrology, Umeå University Hospital, Sweden
AA Welch
Affiliation:
Institute of Public Health, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, UK
EA Spencer
Affiliation:
Cancer Research UK, Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, UK
K Overvad
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, University of Aarhus, Denmark
A Tjønneland
Affiliation:
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark
F Clavel-Chapelon
Affiliation:
INSERM, E3N–EPIC Group, Institute Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France
AB Miller
Affiliation:
Division of Clinical Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Centre, Heidelberg, Germany
K Klipstein-Grobusch
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Germany
P Lagiou
Affiliation:
Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Greece
V Kalapothaki
Affiliation:
Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Greece
G Masala
Affiliation:
Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, CSPO, Scientific Institute of Tuscany, Florence, Italy
MC Giurdanella
Affiliation:
Cancer Registry, ‘Civile – M.P. Arezzo’ Hospital, Ragusa, Italy
T Norat
Affiliation:
Unit of Nutrition, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France
E Riboli
Affiliation:
Unit of Nutrition, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France
Corresponding
E-mail address:
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Abstract

Objective:

To evaluate meat intake patterns in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohorts.

Design and setting:

24-Hour dietary recalls were assessed within the framework of a prospective cohort study in 27 centres across 10 European countries by means of standardised computer-assisted interviews.

Subjects:

In total, 22 924 women and 13 031 men aged 35–74 years.

Results:

Mean total meat intake was lowest in the ‘health-conscious’ cohort in the UK (15 and 21 g day−1 in women and men, respectively) and highest in the north of Spain, especially in San Sebastian (124 and 234 g day−1, respectively). In the southern Spanish centres and in Naples (Italy), meat consumption was distinctly lower than in the north of these countries. Central and northern European centres/countries showed rather similar meat consumption patterns, except for the British and French cohorts. Differences in the intake of meat sub-groups (e.g. red meat, processed meat) across EPIC were even higher than found for total meat intake. With a few exceptions, the Mediterranean EPIC centres revealed a higher proportion of beef/veal and poultry and less pork or processed meat than observed in central or northern European centres. The highest sausage consumption was observed for the German EPIC participants, followed by the Norwegians, Swedish, Danish and Dutch.

Conclusions:

The results demonstrate distinct differences in meat consumption patterns between EPIC centres across Europe. This is an important prerequisite for obtaining further insight into the relationship between meat intake and the development of chronic diseases.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © CABI Publishing 2002

References

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