Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Maternal cereal consumption and adequacy of micronutrient intake in the periconceptional period

  • Meredith Snook Parrott (a1) (a2), Lisa M Bodnar (a1) (a2) (a3), Hyagriv N Simhan (a1) (a2), Gail Harger (a3), Nina Markovic (a3) and James M Roberts (a1) (a2) (a3)...

Abstract

Objective

To assess the adequacy of periconceptional intake of key micronutrients for perinatal health in relation to regular cereal consumption of pregnant women.

Design, setting and subjects

Low-income pregnant women (n 596) in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, who enrolled in a cohort study at <20 weeks’ gestation. These women reported usual dietary intake in the three months around conception on an FFQ. Cereal consumers were women who reported consuming any dry cereal at least three times per week. High risk for nutrient inadequacy was defined as intake less than the Estimated Average Requirement.

Results

About 31 % of the women regularly consumed cereal. After adjusting for energy intake, race/ethnicity, marital status, breakfast consumption and supplement use, cereal eaters had significantly higher intakes of folate, Fe, Zn, Ca, fibre and vitamins A, C, D and E (all P < 0·01) and were approximately two to six times more likely to have intakes in the highest third of the distribution for folate, Fe, Zn, Ca, vitamins A and D, and fibre (all P < 0·01) than cereal non-eaters. Cereal consumption was also associated with reductions of 65–90 % in the risk of nutrient inadequacies compared with non-consumption (all P < 0·01).

Conclusions

Encouraging cereal consumption may be a simple, safe and inexpensive nutrition intervention that could optimize periconceptional intake for successful placental and fetal development.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Maternal cereal consumption and adequacy of micronutrient intake in the periconceptional period
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Maternal cereal consumption and adequacy of micronutrient intake in the periconceptional period
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Maternal cereal consumption and adequacy of micronutrient intake in the periconceptional period
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email bodnar@edc.pitt.edu

References

Hide All
1.Cross, JC, Werb, Z & Fisher, SJ (1994) Implantation and the placenta: key pieces of the development puzzle. Science 266, 15081518.
2.Goodger, AM & Rogers, PA (1993) Uterine endothelial cell proliferation before and after embryo implantation in rats. J Reprod Fertil 99, 451457.
3.Jauniaux, E, Watson, AL, Hempstock, J, Bao, YP, Skepper, JN & Burton, GJ (2000) Onset of maternal arterial blood flow and placental oxidative stress. A possible factor in human early pregnancy failure. Am J Pathol 157, 21112122.
4.Czeizel, AE & Dudas, I (1992) Prevention of the first occurrence of neural-tube defects by periconceptional vitamin supplementation. N Engl J Med 327, 18321835.
5.Bloomfield, FH, Oliver, MH, Hawkins, P, Campbell, M, Phillips, DJ, Gluckman, PD, Challis, JR & Harding, JE (2003) A periconceptional nutritional origin for noninfectious preterm birth. Science 300, 606.
6.MacLaughlin, SM, Walker, SK, Roberts, CT, Kleemann, DO & McMillen, IC (2005) Periconceptional nutrition and the relationship between maternal body weight changes in the periconceptional period and feto-placental growth in the sheep. J Physiol 565, 111124.
7.Oliver, MH, Hawkins, P & Harding, JE (2005) Periconceptional undernutrition alters growth trajectory and metabolic and endocrine responses to fasting in late-gestation fetal sheep. Pediatr Res 57, 591598.
8.Roberts, JM, Balk, JL, Bodnar, LM, Belizan, JM, Bergel, E & Martinez, A (2003) Nutrient involvement in preeclampsia. J Nutr 133, 1684S1692S.
9. US Department of Health and Human Services (2000) Healthy People 2010: National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objectives. Washington, DC: DHHS.
10. US Department of Health and Human Services and US Department of Agriculture (2005) The Report of the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee on Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2005, 6th ed. Washington, DC: DHHS and USDA.
11.Nicklas, TA, O’Neil, CE & Berenson, GS (1998) Nutrient contribution of breakfast, secular trends, and the role of ready-to-eat cereals: a review of data from the Bogalusa Heart Study. Am J Clin Nutr 67, 757S763S.
12.Preziosi, P, Galan, P, Deheeger, M, Yacoub, N, Drewnowski, A & Hercberg, S (1999) Breakfast type, daily nutrient intakes and vitamin and mineral status of French children, adolescents, and adults. J Am Coll Nutr 18, 171178.
13.Williams, P (2005) Breakfast and the diets of Australian adults: an analysis of data from the 1995 National Nutrition Survey. Int J Food Sci Nutr 56, 6579.
14.Cotton, PA, Subar, AF, Friday, JE & Cook, A (2004) Dietary sources of nutrients among US adults, 1994 to 1996. J Am Diet Assoc 104, 921930.
15.Siega-Riz, AM, Bodnar, LM & Savitz, DA (2002) What are pregnant women eating? Nutrient and food group differences by race. Am J Obstet Gynecol 186, 480486.
16.Galvin, MA, Kiely, M & Flynn, A (2003) Impact of ready-to-eat breakfast cereal (RTEBC) consumption on adequacy of micronutrient intakes and compliance with dietary recommendations in Irish adults. Public Health Nutr 6, 351363.
17.Barton, BA, Eldridge, AL, Thompson, D, Affenito, SG, Striegel-Moore, RH, Franko, DL, Albertson, AM & Crockett, SJ (2005) The relationship of breakfast and cereal consumption to nutrient intake and body mass index: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study. J Am Diet Assoc 105, 13831389.
18.Gibson, S (2003) Micronutrient intakes, micronutrient status and lipid profiles among young people consuming different amounts of breakfast cereals: further analysis of data from the National Diet and Nutrition Survey of Young People aged 4 to 18 years. Public Health Nutr 6, 815820.
19.Song, WO, Chun, OK, Kerver, J, Cho, S, Chung, CE & Chung, SJ (2006) Ready-to-eat breakfast cereal consumption enhances milk and calcium intake in the US population. J Am Diet Assoc 106, 17831789.
20.van den Boom, A, Serra-Majem, L, Ribas, L, Ngo, J, Perez-Rodrigo, C, Aranceta, J & Fletcher, R (2006) The contribution of ready-to-eat cereals to daily nutrient intake and breakfast quality in a Mediterranean setting. J Am Coll Nutr 25, 135143.
21.Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board (2006) Dietary Reference Intakes: The Essential Guide to Nutrient Requirements. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.
22.Block, G, Coyle, LM, Hartman, AM & Scoppa, SM (1994) Revision of dietary analysis software for the Health Habits and History Questionnaire. Am J Epidemiol 139, 11901196.
23.Block, G, Hartman, AM, Dresser, CM, Carroll, MD, Gannon, J & Gardner, L (1986) A data-based approach to diet questionnaire design and testing. Am J Epidemiol 124, 453469.
24. Block G & DiSogra C (1994) WIC Dietary Assessment Validation Study. Final Report. Alexandria, VA: US Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service.
25.Block, G, Thompson, FE, Hartman, AM, Larkin, FA & Guire, KE (1992) Comparison of two dietary questionnaires validated against multiple dietary records collected during a 1-year period. J Am Diet Assoc 92, 686693.
26.Block, G, Woods, M, Potosky, A & Clifford, C (1990) Validation of a self-administered diet history questionnaire using multiple diet records. J Clin Epidemiol 43, 13271335.
27.Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board (2000) Folate. In Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.
28.Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board (2002) Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs): Estimated Average Requirements for Groups. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.
29.Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board (2001) Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.
30.Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board (1997) Dietary Reference Intakes for Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Vitamin D, and Fluoride. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.
31.Siega-Riz, AM, Herrmann, TS, Savitz, DA & Thorp, JM (2001) Frequency of eating during pregnancy and its effect on preterm delivery. Am J Epidemiol 153, 647652.
32.Siega-Riz, AM, Popkin, BM & Carson, T (2000) Differences in food patterns at breakfast by sociodemographic characteristics among a nationally representative sample of adults in the United States. Prev Med 30, 415424.
33.Song, WO, Chun, OK, Obayashi, S, Cho, S & Chung, CE (2005) Is consumption of breakfast associated with body mass index in US adults? J Am Diet Assoc 105, 13731382.
34.Cho, S, Dietrich, M, Brown, CJ, Clark, CA & Block, G (2003) The effect of breakfast type on total daily energy intake and body mass index: results from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). J Am Coll Nutr 22, 296302.
35.Willet, WC (1998) Nutritional Epidemiology, 2nd ed.New York: Oxford University Press.

Keywords

Related content

Powered by UNSILO

Maternal cereal consumption and adequacy of micronutrient intake in the periconceptional period

  • Meredith Snook Parrott (a1) (a2), Lisa M Bodnar (a1) (a2) (a3), Hyagriv N Simhan (a1) (a2), Gail Harger (a3), Nina Markovic (a3) and James M Roberts (a1) (a2) (a3)...

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed.