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The home food environment of overweight gatekeepers in the Netherlands

  • Maartje P Poelman (a1), Emely de Vet (a2), Elizabeth Velema (a1), Jacob C Seidell (a1) and Ingrid HM Steenhuis (a1)...

Abstract

Objective

The aim of the present study was to gain insight into (i) processed snack-food availability, (ii) processed snack-food salience and (iii) the size of dinnerware among households with overweight gatekeepers. Moreover, associations between gatekeepers’ characteristics and in-home observations were determined.

Design

A cross-sectional observation of home food environments was conducted as part of a baseline measurement of a larger study.

Setting

Home food environments of overweight and obese gatekeepers in the Netherlands.

Subjects

Household gatekeepers (n 278). Mean household size of the gatekeepers was 3·0 (sd 1·3) persons. Mean age of the gatekeepers was 45·7 (sd 9·2) years, 34·9 % were overweight and 65·1 % were obese. Of the gatekeepers, 20·9 % had a low level of education and 42·7 % had a high level of education.

Results

In 70 % of the households, eight or more packages of processed snack foods were present. In 54 % of the households, processed snack foods were stored close to non-processed food items and in 78 % of households close to non-food items. In 33 % of the households, processed snack foods were visible in the kitchen and in 15 % of the households processed snack foods were visible in the living room. Of the dinnerware items, 14 % (plates), 57 % (glasses), 78 % (dessert bowls), 67 % (soup bowls) and 58 % (mugs) were larger than the reference norms of the Netherlands Nutrition Centre Foundation. Older gatekeepers used significantly smaller dinnerware than younger gatekeepers.

Conclusions

Environmental factors endorsing overconsumption are commonly present in the home environments of overweight people and could lead to unplanned eating or passive overconsumption.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Email m.p.poelman@vu.nl

References

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Keywords

The home food environment of overweight gatekeepers in the Netherlands

  • Maartje P Poelman (a1), Emely de Vet (a2), Elizabeth Velema (a1), Jacob C Seidell (a1) and Ingrid HM Steenhuis (a1)...

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