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Energy intake, energy required and mortality in an older population

  • Paul H Lee (a1) and Choi-Wan Chan (a1)

Abstract

Objectives

The present study evaluated the association between energy intake, energy required and mortality in older adults.

Design

A cohort study with a mean of 10·67 (sd 4·74) years of follow-up. Participants completed a 24 h dietary recall. Energy required per day was computed by BMR. Deaths through 2006 were identified from the National Death Index. A Cox regression was used to estimate the hazard ratios (HR) of quantiles of energy intake and energy required on all-cause and CVD mortality, adjusting for demographics, socio-economic status and co-morbidity.

Setting

The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) III, 1988–1994.

Subjects

A total of 4846 participants aged 60 years or above were analysed.

Results

Within the follow-up period, there were a total of 2954 deaths (61·0 %), 51·9 % were caused by CVD. Relative to those in quartile 1 of energy intake, only quartile 4 was associated with all-cause mortality and CVD mortality with HR of 0·86 (95 % CI 0·77, 0·96, P=0·006) and 0·76 (95 % CI 0·65, 0·89, P=0·001), respectively. On the other hand, relative to those in quartile 1 of energy required, all quartiles of participants had a lower risk of all-cause mortality and CVD mortality. The interaction effects between energy intake and energy required with all-cause and CVD mortality were insignificant (P=0·70 and 0·61, respectively).

Conclusions

Independent of energy required, higher energy intake was associated with lower HR of both all-cause and CVD mortality in older adults.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Email: paul.h.lee@polyu.edu.hk

References

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Supplementary materials

Lee and Chan supplementary material
Tables S1-S6

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Energy intake, energy required and mortality in an older population

  • Paul H Lee (a1) and Choi-Wan Chan (a1)

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