Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Common ways Americans are incorporating fruits and vegetables into their diet: intake patterns by meal, source and form, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–2010

  • Latetia V Moore (a1), Heather C Hamner (a1), Sonia A Kim (a1) and Karen Dalenius (a1)

Abstract

Objective

We explored how Americans aged ≥2 years who consumed the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables on a given day incorporated fruits and vegetables into their diet compared with those who did not consume recommended amounts.

Design

We used 1 d of dietary recall data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007–2010 to examine cross-sectional differences in mean intakes of fruits and vegetables in cup-equivalents by meal, source and form between the two groups.

Setting

USA.

Subjects

NHANES 2007–2010 participants aged ≥2 years (n 17 571) with 1 d of reliable 24 h recall data.

Results

On a given day, the proportions of fruits and vegetables consumed at different meals were similar between those who consumed recommended amounts and those who did not. Among adults, 59–64 % of their intake of fruits was consumed at breakfast or as a snack and almost 90 % came from retail outlets regardless of whether they consumed the recommended amount or not. Adults who consumed the recommended amount of fruits ate more fruits in raw form and with no additions than those who did not. Among children and adults, 52–57 % of vegetables were consumed at dinner by both groups. Retail outlets were the main source of vegetables consumed (60–68 %).

Conclusions

Our findings indicate that habits of when, where and how consumers eat fruits and vegetables might not need to change but increasing the amount consumed would help those not currently meeting the recommendation.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Common ways Americans are incorporating fruits and vegetables into their diet: intake patterns by meal, source and form, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–2010
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Common ways Americans are incorporating fruits and vegetables into their diet: intake patterns by meal, source and form, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–2010
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Common ways Americans are incorporating fruits and vegetables into their diet: intake patterns by meal, source and form, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–2010
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Email lvmoore@cdc.gov

References

Hide All
1. Krebs-Smith, SM, Guenther, PM, Subar, AF et al. (2010) Americans do not meet federal dietary recommendations. J Nutr 140, 18321838.
2. US Department of Agriculture & US Department of Health and Human Services (2012) Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010, 7th ed. Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office.
3. National Cancer Institute, Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program (2015) Usual Dietary Intakes: Food Intakes, US Population, 2007–10. http://epi.grants.cancer.gov/diet/usualintakes/pop/2007-10/ (accessed March 2016).
4. US Department of Agriculture, Economic Researh Service (2014) Average daily intake of food by food source and demographic characteristics, 2007–10. http://www.ers.usda.gov/datafiles/Food_Consumption_and_Nutrient_Intakes/Food_Consumption_Estimates/food_table1.xls (accessed February 2014).
5. Produce for Better Health Foundation (2010) State of the Plate: 2010 Study on America’s Consumption of Fruits and Vegetables. http://www.pbhfoundation.org/pdfs/about/res/pbh_res/stateplate.pdf (accessed February 2014).
6. Sandeno, C, Wolf, G, Drake, T et al. (2000) Behavioral strategies to increase fruit and vegetable intake by fourth- through sixth-grade students. J Am Diet Assoc 100, 828830.
7. Zipf, G, Chiappa, M, Porter, KS, Ostchega, Y et al. (2013) National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey: Plan and Operations, 1999–2010. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_01/sr01_056.pdf (accessed February 2016).
8. US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service (2013) Food Patterns Equivalents Database 2009–2010. http://www.ars.usda.gov/Services/docs.htm?docid=23869 (accessed February 2014).
9. US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service (2013) Food Patterns Equivalents Database 2007–2008. http://www.ars.usda.gov/Services/docs.htm?docid=23869 (accessed February 2014).
10. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2013) National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey: 2009 – 2010 Data Documentation, Codebook, and Frequencies. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhanes/nhanes2009-2010/DR1IFF_F.htm#DR1_030Z (accessed August 2014).
11. US Department of Agriculture (2016) How much fruit is needed daily? http://www.choosemyplate.gov/Fruits (accessed Febuary 2016).
12. US Department of Agriculture (2016) How many vegetables are needed? http://www.choosemyplate.gov/vegetables (accessed Febuary 2016).
13. Thompson, FE & Byers, T (1994) Dietary assessment resource manual. J Nutr 124, 11 Suppl., S2245S2317.
14. Burrows, TL, Martin, RJ & Collins, CE (2010) A systematic review of the validity of dietary assessment methods in children when compared with the method of doubly labeled water. J Am Diet Assoc 110, 15011510.
15. Poppitt, SD, Swann, D, Black, AE et al. (1998) Assessment of selective under-reporting of food intake by both obese and non-obese women in a metabolic facility. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 22, 303311.
16. Moshfegh, AJ, Rhodes, DG, Baer, DJ et al. (2008) The US Department of Agriculture Automated Multiple-Pass Method reduces bias in the collection of energy intakes. Am J Clin Nutr 88, 324332.

Keywords

Related content

Powered by UNSILO
Type Description Title
WORD
Supplementary materials

Moore supplementary material
Appendix Table

 Word (24 KB)
24 KB

Common ways Americans are incorporating fruits and vegetables into their diet: intake patterns by meal, source and form, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–2010

  • Latetia V Moore (a1), Heather C Hamner (a1), Sonia A Kim (a1) and Karen Dalenius (a1)

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed.