Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Body weight and BMI percentiles for children in the South-East Asian Nutrition Surveys (SEANUTS)

  • Sandjaja Sandjaja (a1), Bee Koon Poh (a2), Nipa Rojroongwasinkul (a3), Khanh Le Nguyen Bao (a4), Moesijanti Soekatri (a1) (a5), Jyh Eiin Wong (a2), Atitada Boonpraderm (a3), Chinh Nguyen Huu (a4), Paul Deurenberg (a6) and Yannis Manios (a7)...
  • Please note a correction has been issued for this article.

Abstract

Objective

The present study aimed to (i) calculate body-weight- and BMI-for-age percentile values for children aged 0·5–12 years participating in the South-East Asian Nutrition Survey (SEANUTS); (ii) investigate whether the pooled (i.e. including all countries) SEANUTS weight- and BMI-for-age percentile values can be used for all SEANUTS countries instead of country-specific ones; and (iii) examine whether the pooled SEANUTS percentile values differ from the WHO growth references.

Design

Body weight and length/height were measured. The LMS method was used for calculating smoothened body-weight- and BMI-for-age percentile values. The standardized site effect (SSE) values were used for identifying large differences (i.e. $\left| {{\rm SSE}} \right|$ >0·5) between the pooled SEANUTS sample and the remaining pooled SEANUTS samples after excluding one single country each time, as well as with WHO growth references.

Setting

Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam and Indonesia.

Subjects

Data from 14 202 eligible children.

Results

The SSE derived from the comparisons of the percentile values between the pooled and the remaining pooled SEANUTS samples were indicative of small/acceptable (i.e. $\left| {{\rm SSE}} \right|$ ≤0·5) differences. In contrast, the comparisons of the pooled SEANUTS sample with WHO revealed large differences in certain percentiles.

Conclusions

The findings of the present study support the use of percentile values derived from the pooled SEANUTS sample for evaluating the weight status of children in each SEANUTS country. Nevertheless, large differences were observed in certain percentiles values when SEANUTS and WHO reference values were compared.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Body weight and BMI percentiles for children in the South-East Asian Nutrition Surveys (SEANUTS)
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Body weight and BMI percentiles for children in the South-East Asian Nutrition Surveys (SEANUTS)
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Body weight and BMI percentiles for children in the South-East Asian Nutrition Surveys (SEANUTS)
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email san_gizi@yahoo.com

References

Hide All
1. World Health Organization (2006) WHO Child Growth Standards: Length/Height-for-Age, Weight-for-Age, Weight-for-Length, Weight-for-Height and Body Mass Index-for-Age: Methods and Development. Geneva: WHO, Department of Nutrition for Health and Development.
2. de Onis, M, Onyango, AW, Borghi, E et al. (2007) Development of a WHO growth reference for school-aged children and adolescents. Bull World Health Organ 85, 660667.
3. Zong, XN & Li, H (2013) Construction of a new growth references for China based on urban Chinese children: comparison with the WHO growth standards. PLoS One 8, e59569.
4. Natale, V & Rajagopalan, A (2014) Worldwide variation in human growth and the World Health Organization growth standards: a systematic review. BMJ Open 4, e003735.
5. de Wilde, JA, van Dommelen, P & Middelkoop, BJ (2013) Appropriate body mass index cut-offs to determine thinness, overweight and obesity in South Asian children in the Netherlands. PLoS One 8, e82822.
6. de Wilde, JA, van Dommelen, P, van Buuren, S et al. (2015) Height of South Asian children in the Netherlands aged 0–20 years: secular trends and comparisons with current Asian Indian, Dutch and WHO references. Ann Hum Biol 42, 3844.
7. Freedman, DS, Khan, LK, Serdula, MK et al. (2006) Racial and ethnic differences in secular trends for childhood BMI, weight, and height. Obesity (Silver Spring) 14, 301308.
8. Deaton, A (2007) Height, health, and development. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104, 1323213237.
9. Kuczmarski, RJ, Ogden, CL, Guo, SS et al. (2002) 2000 CDC Growth Charts for the United States: methods and development. Vital Health Stat 11 issue 246, 1190.
10. Prader, A, Largo, RH, Molinari, L et al. (1989) Physical growth of Swiss children from birth to 20 years of age. First Zurich longitudinal study of growth and development. Helv Paediatr Acta Suppl 52, 1125.
11. Kosulwat, V (2002) The nutrition and health transition in Thailand. Public Health Nutr 5, 183189.
12. Noor, MI (2002) The nutrition and health transition in Malaysia. Public Health Nutr 5, 191195.
13. Schaafsma, A, Deurenberg, P, Calame, W et al. (2013) Design of the South East Asian Nutrition Survey (SEANUTS): a four-country multistage cluster design study. Br J Nutr 110, Suppl. 3, S2S10.
14. de Onis, M, Garza, C, Victora, CG et al. (2004) The WHO Multicentre Growth Reference Study: planning, study design, and methodology. Food Nutr Bull 25, 1 Suppl., S15S26.
15. Le Nguyen, BK, Le Thi, H, Nguyen Do, VA et al. (2013) Double burden of undernutrition and overnutrition in Vietnam in 2011: results of the SEANUTS study in 0.5–11-year-old children. Br J Nutr 110, Suppl. 3, S45S56.
16. Rojroongwasinkul, N, Kijboonchoo, K, Wimonpeerapattana, W et al. (2013) SEANUTS: the nutritional status and dietary intakes of 0.5–12-year-old Thai children. Br J Nutr 110, Suppl. 3, S36S44.
17. Poh, BK, Ng, BK, Siti Haslinda, MD et al. (2013) Nutritional status and dietary intakes of children aged 6 months to 12 years: findings of the nutrition survey of Malaysian children (SEANUTS Malaysia). Br J Nutr 110, Suppl. 3, S21S35.
18. Rojroongwasinkul, N, Bao, KL, Sandjaja, S et al. (2016) Length and height percentiles for children in the South-East Asian Nutrition Surveys (SEANUTS). Public Health Nutr 19, 17411750.
19. Cole, TJ & Green, PJ (1992) Smoothing reference centile curves: the LMS method and penalized likelihood. Stat Med 11, 13051319.
20. Cohen, J (1988) Statistical Power Analysis for the Behavioral Sciences, 2nd ed.. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
21. WHO Multicentre Growth Reference Study Group (2006) Assessment of differences in linear growth among populations in the WHO Multicentre Growth Reference Study. Acta Paediatr Suppl 450, 5665.
22. Shetty, PS (2002) Nutrition transition in India. Public Health Nutr 5, 175182.
23. Zong, XN, Li, H & Zhu, ZH (2011) Secular trends in height and weight for healthy Han children aged 0–7 years in China, 1975–2005. Am J Hum Biol 23, 209215.

Keywords

Type Description Title
WORD
Supplementary materials

Sandjaja et al. supplementary material
Table S1

 Word (16 KB)
16 KB
UNKNOWN
Supplementary materials

Sandjaja et al. supplementary material
Table S2

 Unknown (26 KB)
26 KB
UNKNOWN
Supplementary materials

Sandjaja et al. supplementary material
Table S3

 Unknown (26 KB)
26 KB
UNKNOWN
Supplementary materials

Sandjaja et al. supplementary material
Table S4

 Unknown (26 KB)
26 KB
UNKNOWN
Supplementary materials

Sandjaja et al. supplementary material
Table S5

 Unknown (37 KB)
37 KB
UNKNOWN
Supplementary materials

Sandjaja et al. supplementary material
Table S6

 Unknown (29 KB)
29 KB
UNKNOWN
Supplementary materials

Sandjaja et al. supplementary material
Table S7

 Unknown (18 KB)
18 KB
UNKNOWN
Supplementary materials

Sandjaja et al. supplementary material
Table S8

 Unknown (28 KB)
28 KB
UNKNOWN
Supplementary materials

Sandjaja et al. supplementary material
Table S9

 Unknown (20 KB)
20 KB
WORD
Supplementary materials

Sandjaja et al. supplementary material
Figures S1-S4

 Word (423 KB)
423 KB

Body weight and BMI percentiles for children in the South-East Asian Nutrition Surveys (SEANUTS)

  • Sandjaja Sandjaja (a1), Bee Koon Poh (a2), Nipa Rojroongwasinkul (a3), Khanh Le Nguyen Bao (a4), Moesijanti Soekatri (a1) (a5), Jyh Eiin Wong (a2), Atitada Boonpraderm (a3), Chinh Nguyen Huu (a4), Paul Deurenberg (a6) and Yannis Manios (a7)...
  • Please note a correction has been issued for this article.

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed

A correction has been issued for this article: