Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

An examination of the influence of eating location on the diets of Irish children

  • SJ Burke (a1), SN McCarthy (a1), JL O'Neill (a1), EM Hannon (a2), M Kiely (a2), A Flynn (a2) and MJ Gibney (a1)...

Abstract

Objectives

To examine the influence of eating location on the quality of the diets of Irish children and to compare intakes at home with intakes at other people's homes and intakes outside the home, and to compare intakes at various locations outside the home.

Design

Food intake was measured using a 7-day weighed diary in 594 children from the Republic of Ireland (aged 5–12 years). Details of where the food was prepared or obtained were also recorded.

Results

Eighty-nine per cent of all eating occasions occurred at home; < 6% occurred at both other people's homes and outside the home (takeaway, restaurant, shop, other). The percentage of food energy from fat was above the recommended 35% at other people's homes and outside the home, specifically at takeaways and restaurants. Fibre and micronutrient intakes (per 10 MJ) were significantly higher at home than at the other locations (P < 0.05). Within the ‘out’ locations, fibre and micronutrient intakes were generally higher at restaurants and lower at shops. High consumers of foods outside the home had a statistically significant, but relatively small decline in nutrient intakes compared with non- or low consumers. Chips and processed potatoes, meat products, savouries, sugars and confectionery, and savoury snacks made the greatest contribution to foods consumed outside the home.

Conclusions

The main focus of nutrition policies to improve the diets of Irish children should be the home environment rather than the food service sector. However, guidelines could call for better food choices outside the home to improve nutrient intakes.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      An examination of the influence of eating location on the diets of Irish children
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      An examination of the influence of eating location on the diets of Irish children
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      An examination of the influence of eating location on the diets of Irish children
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email Sarah.Burke@ucd.ie

References

Hide All
1Euromonitor. The World Market for Consumer Foodservice, 2004 [online]. Available atwww.euromonitor.com/gmid.default.asp.
2Central Statistics Office (CSO). Annual Services Inquiry 2002. Dublin: The Stationery Office, 2004.
3Central Statistics Office (CSO). Household Budget Survey 1994/1995. Dublin: CSO, 1995.
4Central Statistics Office (CSO). Household Budget Survey 1999/2000. Dublin: CSO, 2001.
5Satia, JA, Galanko, JA, Siega-Riz, AM. Eating at fast-food restaurants is associated with dietary intake, demographic, psychosocial and behavioural factors among African Americans in North Carolina. Public Health Nutrition 2004; 7: 1089–96.
6Burns, C, Jackson, M, Gibbons, C, Stoney, RM. Foods prepared outside the home: association with selected nutrients and body mass index in adult Australians. Public Health Nutrition 2002; 5: 441–8.
7French, SA, Harnack, L, Jeffery, RW. Fast food restaurant use among women in the Pound of Prevention study: dietary, behavioral and demographic correlates. International Journal of Obesity 2000; 24: 1353–9.
8McCrory, MA, Fuss, PJ, Hays, NP, Vinken, AG, Greenberg, AS, Roberts, SB. Overeating in America: association between restaurant food consumption and body fatness in healthy adult men and women ages 19 to 80. Obesity Research 1999; 7: 564–71.
9Le Francois, P, Calamassi-Tran, G, Hebel, P, Renault, C, Lebreton, S, Volatier, JL. Food and nutrient intake outside the home of 629 French people of fifteen years and over. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 1996; 50: 826–31.
10Loughridge, JM, Walker, AD, Sarsby, H, Shepherd, R. Foods eaten outside the home: nutrient contribution to total diet. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics 1989; 2: 361–9.
11Irish Universities Nutrition Alliance. North/South Ireland Food Consumption Survey Summary Report. Dublin: Food Safety Promotion Board, 2001.
12O'Dwyer, NA, Gibney, MJ, Burke, SJ, McCarthy, SN. The influence of eating location on nutrient intakes in Irish adults: implications for developing food-based dietary guidelines. Public Health Nutrition 2005; 8: 258–65.
13Bowman, SA, Gortmaker, SL, Ebbeling, CB, Pereira, MA, Ludwig, DS. Effects of fast-food consumption on energy intake and diet quality among children in a national household survey. Pediatrics 2004; 113: 112–8.
14Thompson, OM, Ballew, C, Resnicow, K, Must, A, Bandini, LG, Cyr, H, et al. . Food purchased away from home as a predictor of change in BMI z-score among girls. International Journal of Obesity 2004; 28: 282–9.
15Zoumas-Morse, C, Rock, CL, Sobo, EJ, Neuhouser, ML. Children's patterns of macronutrient intake and associations with restaurant and home eating. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 2001; 101: 923–5.
16Lin, BH, Guthrie, J, Frazao, E. Quality of children's diets at and away from home: 1994–96. Food Review 1999; 22: 210.
17Irish Universities Nutrition Alliance. National Children's Food Survey, 2005 [online]. Available atwww.iuna.net.
18Food Standards Agency. McCance and Widdowson's The Composition of Foods, 6th summary ed. Cambridge: Royal Society of Chemistry, 2002.
19Holland, B, Welch, AA, Unwin, ID, Buss, DH, Paul, AA, Southgate, DAT. McCance & Widdowson's The Composition of Foods, 5th ed. London: HMSO, 1995.
20Chan, W, Brown, J, Church, SM, Buss, DH. Meat Products and Dishes. Sixth Supplement to McCance & Widdowson's The Composition of Foods, 5th ed. London: HMSO, 1996.
21Chan, W, Brown, J, Lee, SJ, Buss, DH. Meat, Poultry and Game. Fifth Supplement to McCance & Widdowson's The Composition of Foods, 5th ed. London: HMSO, 1995.
22Chan, W, Brown, J, Buss, DH. Miscellaneous Foods. Fourth Supplement to McCance & Widdowson's The Composition of Foods, 5th ed. London: HMSO, 1994.
23Holland, B, Welch, AA, Buss, DH. Vegetable Dishes. Second Supplement to McCance & Widdowson's The Composition of Foods, 5th ed. London: HMSO, 1996.
24Holland, B, Brown, J, Buss, DH. Fish and Fish Products. Third Supplement to McCance & Widdowson's The Composition of Foods, 5th ed. London: HMSO, 1993.
25Holland, B, Unwin, ID, Buss, DH. Fruits and Nuts. First Supplement to McCance & Widdowson's The Composition of Foods, 5th ed. London: HMSO, 1992.
26Holland, B, Unwin, ID, Buss, DH. Vegetables, Herbs and Spices. Fifth Supplement to McCance & Widdowson's The Composition of Foods, 4 ed. London: HMSO, 1991.
27Holland, B, Unwin, ID, Buss, DH. Milk Products and Eggs. Fourth Supplement to McCance & Widdowson's The Composition of Foods, 4th ed. London: HMSO, 1989.
28Holland, B, Unwin, ID, Buss, DH. Cereal and Cereal Products. Third Supplement to McCance & Widdowson's The Composition of Foods, 4th ed. London: HMSO, 1988.
29Department of Health (UK). Dietary Reference Values for Food, Energy and Nutrients for the United Kingdom. Report of the Panel on Dietary Aspects of Food Policy. London: HMSO, 1991.
30Eurodiet Core Report. Nutrition and diet for healthy lifestyles in Europe: science and policy implications. Public Health Nutrition 2001; 4: 265–73.
31Kearney, JM, Hulshof, KF, Gibney, MJ. Eating patterns – temporal distribution, converging and diverging foods, meals eaten inside and outside of the home – implications for developing FBDG. Public Health Nutrition 2001; 4: 693–8.
32Paeratakul, S, Ferdinand, DP, Champagne, CM, Ryan, DH, Bray, GA. Fast-food consumption among US adults and children: dietary and nutrient intake profile. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 2003; 103: 1332–8.
33Nicklas, TA, Morales, M, Linares, A, Yang, SJ, Baranowski, T, De Moor, C, Berenson, G. Children's meal patterns have changed over a 21-year period: the Bogalusa heart study. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 2004; 104: 753–61.
34Magarey, A, Nichols, J, Boulton, J. Food intake at age 8. 2. Frequency, company and place of meals. Australian Paediatric Journal 1987; 23: 179–80.
35Gillis, LJ, Bar-Or, O. Food away from home, sugar-sweetened drink consumption and juvenile obesity. Journal of the American College of Nutrition 2003; 22: 539–45.
36Gonzales, EN, Marshall, JA, Heimendinger, J, Crane, LA, Neal, WA. Home and eating environments are associated with saturated fat intake in children in rural West Virginia. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 2002; 102: 657–63.
37Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. Family Food in 2002–03. London: The Stationery Office, 2004.

Keywords

An examination of the influence of eating location on the diets of Irish children

  • SJ Burke (a1), SN McCarthy (a1), JL O'Neill (a1), EM Hannon (a2), M Kiely (a2), A Flynn (a2) and MJ Gibney (a1)...

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed