Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Alcoholic beverage intake throughout the week and contribution to dietary energy intake in Australian adults

  • Brooke S Wymond (a1), Kacie M Dickinson (a1) and Malcolm D Riley (a2)

Abstract

Objective

To assess alcoholic beverage intake among Australian adults and its contribution to dietary energy intake.

Design

Secondary analysis of a national dietary survey using 24 h dietary recall.

Setting

Australian National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey (NNPAS) conducted from May 2011 to June 2012.

Subjects

Adults (n 9341) aged 19 years and over.

Results

On the day preceding the survey, 32·8% of Australian adults consumed one or more alcoholic drinks. The median contribution to total energy intake for consumers did not differ significantly between males and females (13·7% and 12·9%, respectively; P=0·10). The prevalence of consumption of alcoholic drinks on Friday, Saturday and Sunday was 38·8 (95% CI 37·1, 40·5)%, higher than the other days (28·6 (95% CI 27·5, 29·8)%). Consumers had a median daily intake of 4·0 standard drinks on the weekend compared with 3·0 standard drinks during the week (P<0·001). Beer was the most commonly consumed alcoholic beverage for men and white wine for women. The highest prevalence of alcoholic beverage intake occurred in the highest quintile of adjusted household income (42·7 (95% CI 40·4, 45·0)%) and the ‘overweight’ BMI category (40·3 (95% CI 38·5, 42·0)%). Alcoholic beverage intake among consumers was significantly different by household income quintile (median 3·84 (highest) v. 3·05 standard drinks (lowest); P<0·05) and by waist circumference category (median 4·09 standard drinks (highest)).

Conclusions

Alcoholic drinks contribute substantially to the dietary energy intake of Australian adults. The type and pattern of consumption of alcoholic beverage intake should be considered in the development of strategies to improve dietary intake.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Alcoholic beverage intake throughout the week and contribution to dietary energy intake in Australian adults
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Alcoholic beverage intake throughout the week and contribution to dietary energy intake in Australian adults
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Alcoholic beverage intake throughout the week and contribution to dietary energy intake in Australian adults
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Email Malcolm.Riley@csiro.au

References

Hide All
1. VicHealth (2013) Drinking-related lifestyles: exploring the role of alcohol in Victorians’ lives. Research summary. http://www.vichealth.vic.gov.au/drinking-lifestyles (accessed October 2014).
2. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2012) Australian Health Survey: First Results, 2011–12. http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/0/D522399EBE2DAB46CA257AA30014BE96?opendocument (accessed December 2015).
3. National Health and Medical Research Council (2011) Alcohol guidelines: reducing the health risks. https://www.nhmrc.gov.au/your-health/alcohol-guidelines (accessed October 2014).
4. World Health Organization (2014) Global status report on alcohol and health 2014. http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/112736/1/9789240692763_eng.pdf?ua=1 (accessed December 2014).
5. Bowden, JA, Delfabbro, P, Room, R et al. (2014) Alcohol consumption and NHMRC guidelines: has the message got out, are people conforming and are they aware that alcohol causes cancer? Aust N Z J Public Health 38, 6672.
6. Ronksley, PE, Brien, SE, Turner, BJ et al. (2011) Association of alcohol consumption with selected cardiovascular disease outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ 342, d671.
7. Roerecke, M & Rehm, J (2010) Irregular heavy drinking occasions and risk of ischemic heart disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Am J Epidemiol 171, 633644.
8. Yeomans, MR, Hails, NJ & Nesic, JS (1999) Alcohol and the appetizer effect. Behav Pharmacol 10, 151161.
9. Westerterp-Plantenga, MS & Verwegen, CRT (1999) The appetizing effect of an aperitif in overweight and normal-weight humans. Am J Clin Nutr 69, 205212.
10. Sayon-Orea, C, Martinez-Gonzalez, MA & Bes-Rastrollo, M (2011) Alcohol consumption and body weight: a systematic review. Nutr Rev 69, 419431.
11. Fischer, S & Smith, GT (2008) Binge eating, problem drinking, and pathological gambling: linking behavior to shared traits and social learning. Pers Individ Diff 44, 789800.
12. World Health Organization (2014) Obesity and overweight. http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs311/en/ (accessed October 2014).
13. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2014) Overweight and obesity. http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/Lookup/by%20Subject/4338.0~2011-13~Main%20Features~Overweight%20and%20obesity~10007 (accessed November 2014).
14. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2014) Overweight and obesity. http://www.aihw.gov.au/overweight-and-obesity/ (accessed November 2014).
15. Racette, SB, Weiss, EP, Schechtman, KB et al. (2008) Influence of weekend lifestyle patterns on body weight. Obesity (Silver Spring) 16, 18261830.
16. Australian Bureau of Statistics (1995) National Nutrition Survey, Foods Eaten, Australia, 1995. http://www.ausstats.abs.gov.au/ausstats/subscriber.nsf/0/CA25687100069892CA256888001CD460/$File/48040_1995.pdf (accessed December 2014).
17. Breslow, RA, Chen, CM, Graubard, BI et al. (2013) Diets of drinkers on drinking and nondrinking days: NHANES 2003–2008. Am J Clin Nutr 97, 10681075.
18. Gibson, S & Shirreffs, SM (2013) Beverage consumption habits ‘24/7’ among British adults: association with total water intake and energy intake. Nutr J 12, 9.
19. Sieri, S, Agudo, A, Kesse, E et al. (2002) Patterns of alcohol consumption in 10 European countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) project. Public Health Nutr 5, 12871296.
20. Studer, J, Baggio, S, Daeppen, JB et al. (2014) Differential association of drinking motives with alcohol use on weekdays and weekends. Psychol Addict Behav 28, 651658.
21. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2014) About the Australian Health Survey. http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/Lookup/4364.0.55.001Chapter1202011-12 (accessed December 2014).
22. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2014) Australian Health Survey: Nutrition First Results – Foods and Nutrients, 2011–12. National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey (NNPAS). http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/mf/4364.0.55.007 (accessed December 2015).
23. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2014) Australian Health Survey: Users’ Guide, 2011–13. http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/PrimaryMainFeatures/4363.0.55.001?OpenDocument (accessed December 2015).
24. Australian Government Department of Health (2010) Secondary supply. http://www.alcohol.gov.au/internet/alcohol/publishing.nsf/Content/secondary (accessed December 2015).
25. National Health and Medical Research Council (2013) Eat for Health; Australian Dietary Guidelines. http://www.eatforhealth.gov.au/sites/default/files/files/the_guidelines/n55_australian_dietary_guidelines.pdf (accessed November 2014).
26. Food Standards Australian and New Zealand (2013) AUSNUT 2011–12 food and dietary supplement classification system. http://www.foodstandards.gov.au/science/monitoringnutrients/ausnut/ausnutdatafiles/Pages/foodclassification.aspx (accessed November 2014).
27. Australian Government Department of Health (2010) Standard drinks guide. http://www.alcohol.gov.au/internet/alcohol/publishing.nsf/Content/drinksguide-cnt (accessed December 2014).
28. World Health Organization (2014) BMI Classification. http://apps.who.int/bmi/index.jsp?introPage=intro_3.html (accessed November 2014).
29. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2014) Apparent Consumption of Alcohol, Australia 2013–14. http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/mf/4307.0.55.001 (accessed December 2015).
30. Wilsnack, RW, Vogeltanz, ND, Wilsnack, SC et al. (2000) Gender differences in alcohol consumption and adverse drinking consequences: cross-cultural patterns. Addiction 95, 251265.
31. Frezza, MMD, di Padova, CMD, Pozzato, GMD et al. (1990) High blood alcohol levels in women. N Engl J Med 322, 9599.
32. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (2014) Underage Drinking. http://www.niaaa.nih.gov/alcohol-health/special-populations-co-occurring-disorders/underage-drinking (accessed December 2014).
33. Lader, D & Steel, M (2010) Drinking: Adults’ Behaviour and Knowledge in 2009. Opinions Survey Report no. 42. London: Office for National Statistics.
34. US Department of Health and Human Services (2012) Calories consumed from alcoholic beverages by US adults, 2007–2010. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db110.pdf (accessed December 2014).
35. Galán, I, González, MJ & Valencia-Martín, JL (2014) Alcohol drinking patterns in Spain: a country in transition. Rev Esp Salud Publica 88, 529540.
36. Kuipers, MAG, Jongeneel-Grimen, B, Droomers, M et al. (2013) Why residents of Dutch deprived neighbourhoods are less likely to be heavy drinkers: the role of individual and contextual characteristics. J Epidemiol Community Health 67, 587594.
37. Fone, DL, Farewell, DM, White, J et al. (2013) Socioeconomic patterning of excess alcohol consumption and binge drinking: a cross-sectional study of multilevel associations with neighbourhood deprivation. BMJ Open 3, e002337.
38. Huckle, T, You, RQ & Casswell, S (2010) Socio-economic status predicts drinking patterns but not alcohol-related consequences independently. Addiction 105, 11921202.
39. Arif, A & Rohrer, J (2005) Patterns of alcohol drinking and its association with obesity: data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988–1994. BMC Public Health 5, 126.
40. Wannamethee, S & Shaper, AG (2003) Alcohol, body weight, and weight gain in middle-aged men. Am J Clin Nutr 77, 13121317.
41. Tolstrup, JS, Heitmann, BL, Tjonneland, AM et al. (2005) The relation between drinking pattern and body mass index and waist and hip circumference. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 29, 490497.
42. Breslow, RA & Smothers, BA (2005) Drinking patterns and body mass index in never smokers: National Health Interview Survey, 1997–2001. Am J Epidemiol 161, 368376.
43. Schutze, M, Schulz, M, Steffen, A et al. (2009) Beer consumption and the ‘beer belly’: scientific basis or common belief. Eur J Clin Nutr 63, 11431149.
44. Yeomans, MR (2010) Alcohol, appetite and energy balance: is alcohol intake a risk factor for obesity? Physiol Behav 100, 8289.
45. Bendsen, NT, Christensen, R, Bartels, EM et al. (2013) Is beer consumption related to measures of abdominal and general obesity? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Nutr Rev 71, 6787.
46. Sim, F (2015) Alcoholic drinks contribute to obesity and should come with mandatory calorie counts. BMJ 350, h2047.
47. Macdiarmid, J & Blundell, J (1998) Assessing dietary intake: who, what and why of under-reporting. Nutr Res Rev 11, 231253.
48. Midanik, LT (1988) Validity of self-reported alcohol use: a literature review and assessment. Br J Addict 83, 10191029.
49. Kerr, WC, Patterson, D, Koenen, MA et al. (2009) Large drinks are no mistake: glass size, not shape, affects alcoholic beverage drink pours. Drug Alcohol Rev 28, 360365.

Keywords

Related content

Powered by UNSILO

Alcoholic beverage intake throughout the week and contribution to dietary energy intake in Australian adults

  • Brooke S Wymond (a1), Kacie M Dickinson (a1) and Malcolm D Riley (a2)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed.