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Adolescent television viewing and unhealthy snack food consumption: the mediating role of home availability of unhealthy snack foods

  • Natalie Pearson (a1) (a2), Stuart JH Biddle (a1), Lauren Williams (a3), Anthony Worsley (a2), David Crawford (a2) and Kylie Ball (a2)...

Abstract

Objective

To examine whether home availability of energy-dense snack foods mediates the association between television (TV) viewing and energy-dense snack consumption among adolescents.

Design

Cross-sectional.

Setting

Secondary schools in Victoria, Australia.

Subjects

Adolescents (n 2984) from Years 7 and 9 of secondary school completed a web-based survey, between September 2004 and July 2005, assessing their energy-dense snack food consumption, school-day and weekend-day TV viewing and home availability of energy-dense snack foods.

Results

School-day and weekend-day TV viewing were positively associated with energy-dense snack consumption among adolescent boys (β = 0·003, P < 0·001) and girls (β = 0·03, P < 0·001). Furthermore, TV viewing (school day and weekend day) were positively associated with home availability of energy-dense snack foods among adolescent boys and girls and home availability of energy-dense snack foods was positively associated with energy-dense snack food consumption among boys (β = 0·26, P < 0·001) and girls (β = 0·28, P < 0·001). Home availability partly mediated the association between TV viewing and energy-dense snack consumption.

Conclusions

The results of the present study suggest that TV viewing has a significant role to play in adolescent unhealthy eating behaviours. Future research should assess the efficacy of methods to reduce adolescent energy-dense snack food consumption by targeting parents to reduce home availability of energy-dense foods and by reducing TV viewing behaviours of adolescents.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email n.l.pearson@lboro.ac.uk

References

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Keywords

Adolescent television viewing and unhealthy snack food consumption: the mediating role of home availability of unhealthy snack foods

  • Natalie Pearson (a1) (a2), Stuart JH Biddle (a1), Lauren Williams (a3), Anthony Worsley (a2), David Crawford (a2) and Kylie Ball (a2)...

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