Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Acceptance of health-promoting Brassica vegetables: the influence of taste perception, information and attitudes

  • David N Cox (a1), Lauro Melo (a1), Dimitrios Zabaras (a2) and Conor M Delahunty (a2)

Abstract

Objective

To investigate the relative importance of specific health knowledge and taste on acceptance of Brassica vegetables (broccoli, red and green cabbages, broccolini, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts).

Design

In a sample of adults all reporting medium–high physical activity (as a marker/control of health behaviour) and reporting either low (≤2 portions/d) or high (≥3 portions/d) vegetable intake, half of those with low vegetable consumption (Li group) and half of those with high vegetable consumption (Hi group) received cancer protection information, while the other half did not (Ln and Hn groups), before hedonic (9-point), perceived taste and flavour impact responses (100 mm scales) to samples of six Brassica vegetables were elicited. Additionally, attitudes towards foods for health, pleasure and reward, sociodemographics, intentions to consume the vegetables in the near future and recall of health information were also measured.

Subjects

Adult males and females (n 200) aged 18–55 years.

Setting

Central location testing, Adelaide, Australia.

Results

Information groups Li and Hi reported specific cancer protection information knowledge, in contrast to Ln and Hn groups (P < 0·000). Information independently influenced responses to (the least liked) Brussels sprouts only. Multivariate regression analysis found sensory perception tended to predict liking and intentions to consume Brassica vegetables. For example, broccoli hedonics (adjusted R 2 = 0·37) were predicted (P < 0·05) by bitterness (β = −0·38), flavour (β = 0·31), sweetness (β = 0·17) and female gender (β = 0·19) and intentions to consume (adjusted R 2 = 0·20) were predicted (P < 0·05) by bitterness (β = −0·38), flavour (β = 0·24), female gender (β = 0·20) and vegetable intake (β = 0·14).

Conclusions

Addressing taste dimensions (while retaining healthy compounds) may be more important than promoting health information in order to increase the popularity of Brassica vegetables.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Acceptance of health-promoting Brassica vegetables: the influence of taste perception, information and attitudes
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Acceptance of health-promoting Brassica vegetables: the influence of taste perception, information and attitudes
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Acceptance of health-promoting Brassica vegetables: the influence of taste perception, information and attitudes
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Email david.cox@csiro.au

References

Hide All
1. Jahangir, M, Kim, HK, Choi, YH et al. (2009) Health-affecting compounds in Brassicaceae . Comp Rev Food Sci Food Saf 8, 3143.
2. Drewnowski, A & Gomez-Carneros, C (2000) Bitter taste, phytonutrients, and the consumer: a review. Am J Clin Nutr 72, 14241435.
3. Reed, DR, Tanaka, T & McDaniel, AH (2006) Diverse tastes: genetics of sweet and bitter perception. Physiol Behav 88, 215226.
4. Tuorila, H, Huotilainen, A, Lahteenmaki, L et al. (2008) Comparison of affective rating scales and their relationship to variables reflecting food consumption. Food Qual Pref 19, 5161.
5. Schatzer, M, Rust, P & Elmadfa, I (2010) Fruit and vegetable intake in Austrian adults: intake frequency, serving sizes, reasons for and barriers to consumption, and potential for increasing consumption. Public Health Nutr 13, 480487.
6. Birch, LL (1999) Development of food preferences. Annu Rev Nutr 19, 4162.
7. Drewnowski, A (2001) The science and complexity of bitter taste. Nutr Rev 59, 163169.
8. Newcomb, RD, McRae, J, Ingram, J et al. (2010) Genetic variation in taste and odour perception: an emerging science to guide new product development. In Consumer Driven Innovation in Food and Personal Care Products, pp. 571591 [SR Jaeger and HJH MacFie, editors]. Oxford: Woodhead Publishing Ltd.
9. de Houwer, J, Thomas, S & Baeyens, F (2001) Associative learning of likes and dislikes: a review of 25 years of research on human evaluative conditioning. Psychol Bull 127, 853869.
10. Eertmans, E, Baeyens, F & van den Bergh, O (2001) Food likes and their relative importance in human eating behavior: review and preliminary suggestions for health promotion. Health Educ Res 16, 443456.
11. Anderson, AS, Cox, DN, McKellar, S et al. (1998) Take Five, a nutrition education intervention to increase fruit and vegetable intakes: impact on attitudes towards dietary change. Br J Nutr 80, 133140.
12. Cox, DN, Anderson, AS, Reynolds, J et al. (1998) Take Five, a nutrition education intervention to increase fruit and vegetable intakes: impact on consumer choice and nutrient intakes. Br J Nutr 80, 123131.
13. Lucknow, T, Sheehan, V, Fitzgerald, E et al. (2006) Exposure, health information, flavour masking strategies for improving sensory quality of probiotic juice. Appetite 47, 315323.
14. Mialon, VS, Clark, MR, Leppard, PI et al. (2002) The effect of dietary fibre information on consumer responses to breads and ‘English’ muffins: a cross-cultural study. Food Qual Pref 13, 112.
15. Sabbe, S, Verbeke, W, Deliza, R et al. (2009) Effect of a health claim and personal characteristics on consumer acceptance of fruit juices with different concentrations of acai (Euterpe oleracea Mart.). Appetite 53, 8492.
16. Tuorila, H, Andersson, Å, Martikainen, A et al. (1998) Effect of product formula, information and consumer characteristics on the acceptance of a new snack food. Food Qual Pref 9, 313320.
17. Tuorila, H, Meiselman, HL, Bell, R et al. (1994) Role of sensory and cognitive information in the enhancement of certainty and linking for novel and familiar foods. Appetite 23, 231246.
18. Wansink, B (2003) Overcoming the taste stigma of soy. J Food Sci 68, 26042606.
19. Wansink, B, van Ittersum, K & Painter, JE (2004) How diet and health labels influence taste and satiation. J Food Sci 69, issue 9, S340S346.
20. van den Heuvel, T, van Trijp, H, van Woerkum, C et al. (2007) Linking product offering to consumer needs; inclusion of credence attributes and the influences of product features. Food Qual Pref 18, 296304.
21. Willett, W (2010) Fruits, vegetables and cancer prevention: turmoil in the produce section. J Nat Cancer Inst 102, 510511.
22. The Cancer Council Australia (2007) National Cancer Prevention Policy 2007–09. Camperdown, NSW: The Cancer Council Australia.
23. Aaron, JI, Mela, DJ & Evans, RE (1994) The influences of attitudes, beliefs and label information on perceptions of reduced-fat spread. Appetite 22, 2537.
24. Roininen, K, Lahteenmaki, L & Tuorila, H (1999) Quantification of consumer attitudes to health and hedonic characteristics of foods. Appetite 33, 7188.
25. Roininen, K, Tuorila, H, Zandstra, EH et al. (2001) Differences in health and taste attitudes and reported behaviour among Finnish, Dutch and British consumers: a cross-national validation of the Health and Taste Attitude Scales (HTAS). Appetite 37, 3345.
26. Ball, K, Crawford, D & Mishra, G (2006) Socio-economic inequalities in women's fruit and vegetable intakes: a multilevel study of individual, social and environmental mediators. Public Health Nutr 9, 623630.
27. Zabaras, D, Cox, DN, Konczak, I et al. (2011) Health-Promoting Vegetables that do not Compromise on Taste. Sydney: Horticulture Australia Limited.
28. Macfie, HJ, Bratchell, N, Greenhoff, K et al. (1989) Designs to balance the effect of order of presentation and first-order carry-over effects in hall tests. J Sens Stud 4, 129148.
29. Booth, M (2000) Assessment of physical activity: an international perspective. Res Q Exerc Sport 72, 2 Suppl., S114S120.
30. IPAQ Group (2011) International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). http://www.ipaq.ki.se (accessed February 2011).
31. Prescott, J (2010) Analysis, acceptability & cognition. In Proceedings of the 4th European Conference on Sensory and Consumer Research, Vitoria-Gastiez, Spain, 5–8 September 2010. Oxford: Elsevier.
32. Earthy, PJ, MacFie, HJH & Hedderley, D (1997) Effect of question order on sensory perception and preference in central location trials. J Sens Stud 12, 215237.
33. Peryam, D & Girardot, NF (1952) Advanced taste test method. Food Eng 24, 5861.
34. Freshlogic (2011) Veginsights: The market – Q1 11, A profile of the three-month period ending 31 March 2011. http://www.pma-anz.com/userfiles/files/Veginsights%20June%202011.pdf (accessed April 2011).
35. Bialkova, S & van Trijp, HCM (2011) An efficient methodology for assessing attention to and effect of nutrition information displayed front-of-pack. Food Qual Pref 22, 592601.
36. Carter, OBJ, Pollard, CM, Atkins, JFP et al. (2011) ‘We're not told why – we're just told’: qualitative reflections about the Western Australian Go for 2&5® fruit and vegetable campaign. Public Health Nutr 14, 982988.
37. Worch, T, , S & Punter, P (2010) How reliable are the consumers? Comparison of sensory profiles from consumers and experts. Food Qual Pref 21, 309318.
38. Pollard, C, Miller, M, Woodman, RJ et al. (2009) Changes in knowledge, beliefs, and behaviors related to fruit and vegetable consumption among western Australian adults from 1995 to 2004. Am J Public Health 99, 355361.
39. Wardle, J, Haase, AM, Steptoe, A et al. (2004) Gender differences in food choice: the contribution of health beliefs and dieting. Ann Behav Med 27, 107116.
40. Nordin, S (2010) Sensory perception of food and ageing. In Food for the Ageing Population, pp. 7394 [M Raats, L de Groot and W van Staveren, editors]. Oxford: Woodhead Publishing Ltd.
41. Corsini, N, Slater, A, Harrison, A et al. (2011) Rewards can be used effectively with repeated taste exposure to increase liking of vegetables in 4–6 year-old children. Public Health Nutr (Epublication ahead of print version).

Keywords

Acceptance of health-promoting Brassica vegetables: the influence of taste perception, information and attitudes

  • David N Cox (a1), Lauro Melo (a1), Dimitrios Zabaras (a2) and Conor M Delahunty (a2)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed