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Percentage of energy contribution according to the degree of industrial food processing and associated factors in adolescents (EVA-JF study, Brazil)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 January 2021

Adriana ST Melo
Affiliation:
Postgraduate Program in Public Health, School of Medicine, Federal University of Juiz de Fora (UFJF), Juiz de Fora, MG, Brazil Department of Nutrition, Institute of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Juiz de Fora (UFJF), José Lourenço Kelmer St, Campus Universitário, São Pedro, Juiz de Fora, MG 36036-900, Brazil
Felipe S Neves
Affiliation:
Postgraduate Program in Public Health, School of Medicine, Federal University of Juiz de Fora (UFJF), Juiz de Fora, MG, Brazil Department of Nutrition, Institute of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Juiz de Fora (UFJF), José Lourenço Kelmer St, Campus Universitário, São Pedro, Juiz de Fora, MG 36036-900, Brazil
Aline P Batista
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Federal University of Ouro Preto (UFOP), Ouro Preto, MG, Brazil
George Luiz L Machado-Coelho
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Federal University of Ouro Preto (UFOP), Ouro Preto, MG, Brazil
Daniela S Sartorelli
Affiliation:
Department of Social Medicine, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo (USP), Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil
Eliane R de Faria
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, Institute of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Juiz de Fora (UFJF), José Lourenço Kelmer St, Campus Universitário, São Pedro, Juiz de Fora, MG 36036-900, Brazil
Michele P Netto
Affiliation:
Postgraduate Program in Public Health, School of Medicine, Federal University of Juiz de Fora (UFJF), Juiz de Fora, MG, Brazil Department of Nutrition, Institute of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Juiz de Fora (UFJF), José Lourenço Kelmer St, Campus Universitário, São Pedro, Juiz de Fora, MG 36036-900, Brazil
Renata MS Oliveira
Affiliation:
Postgraduate Program in Public Health, School of Medicine, Federal University of Juiz de Fora (UFJF), Juiz de Fora, MG, Brazil Department of Nutrition, Institute of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Juiz de Fora (UFJF), José Lourenço Kelmer St, Campus Universitário, São Pedro, Juiz de Fora, MG 36036-900, Brazil
Vanessa S Fontes
Affiliation:
Postgraduate Program in Public Health, School of Medicine, Federal University of Juiz de Fora (UFJF), Juiz de Fora, MG, Brazil Department of Nutrition, Institute of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Juiz de Fora (UFJF), José Lourenço Kelmer St, Campus Universitário, São Pedro, Juiz de Fora, MG 36036-900, Brazil
Ana Paula C Cândido
Affiliation:
Postgraduate Program in Public Health, School of Medicine, Federal University of Juiz de Fora (UFJF), Juiz de Fora, MG, Brazil Department of Nutrition, Institute of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Juiz de Fora (UFJF), José Lourenço Kelmer St, Campus Universitário, São Pedro, Juiz de Fora, MG 36036-900, Brazil
Corresponding

Abstract

Objective:

To evaluate energetic contribution according to the degree of industrial food processing and its association with sociodemographic, anthropometric, biochemical, clinical and behavioural characteristics in adolescents.

Design:

Cross-sectional study (Adolescent Lifestyle Study). Food consumption was assessed using 24-h dietary recalls, with foods classified by degree of industrial progressing. The usual diet was estimated using the Multiple Source Method. In a linear regression model, the energy percentage (E %) was associated with sociodemographic, anthropometric, biochemical, clinical and behavioural characteristics, after adjustment for sex and age.

Setting:

Juiz de Fora, Brazil.

Participants:

Eight hundred and four adolescents, of both sexes, 14–19 years of age, enrolled in public schools.

Results:

The E % of unprocessed or minimally processed foods corresponded to 43·1 %, processed foods to 11·0 % and the ultraprocessed foods to 45·9 %. E % of unprocessed foods was associated with socio-economic stratum (adjusted β = −0·093; P = 0·032), neck circumference (adjusted β = 0·017; P = 0·049), screen time (adjusted β = −0·247; P = 0·036) and HDL-cholesterol (adjusted β = −0·156; P = 0·003). E % of ultraprocessed foods was associated with socio-economic stratum (adjusted β = 0·118; P = 0·011), screen time (adjusted β = 0·375; P = 0·003), BMI (adjusted β = −0·029; P = 0·025), neck circumference (adjusted β = −0·017; P = 0·028) and HDL-cholesterol (adjusted β = 0·150; P = 0·002).

Conclusions:

There was a high E % of ultraprocessed foods in the diet of the adolescents. Actions are needed to raise the awareness of adopting healthy eating habits.

Type
Research paper
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Nutrition Society

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