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Orange juice intake and anthropometric changes in children and adolescents

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 October 2020


Junichi R Sakaki
Affiliation:
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Connecticut, 27 Manter Rd., Unit 4017, Storrs, CT 06269, USA
Jing Li
Affiliation:
Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA
Melissa M Melough
Affiliation:
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Connecticut, 27 Manter Rd., Unit 4017, Storrs, CT 06269, USA
Kyungho Ha
Affiliation:
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Connecticut, 27 Manter Rd., Unit 4017, Storrs, CT 06269, USA
Rulla M Tamimi
Affiliation:
Harvard Medical School, Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA
Jorge E Chavarro
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA
Ming-Hui Chen
Affiliation:
Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA
Ock K Chun
Affiliation:
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Connecticut, 27 Manter Rd., Unit 4017, Storrs, CT 06269, USA
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Objective:

Evaluate associations between orange juice (OJ) consumption and anthropometric parameters.

Design:

Prospective cohort study assessing the association between OJ intake and changes in BMI and height-for-age Z-score (HAZ) using mixed linear regression.

Setting:

2004–2008, USA.

Participants:

Children from the Growing Up Today Study II (n 7301), aged 9–16 years at enrollment.

Results:

OJ consumption was positively associated with 2-year change in HAZ in girls (mean (se)): 0·03 (0·01) for non-consumers, 0·03 (0·02) for 1–3 glasses/month, 0·06 (0·01) for 1–6 glasses/week and 0·09 (0·02) for ≥1 glass/d after full adjustment (Ptrend = 0·02). However, OJ consumption was not associated with 2-year change in BMI percentile (kg/m2, mean (se)): –0·44 (0·36) for non-consumers, 0·20 (0·41) for 1–3 glasses/month, –0·04 (0·34) for 1–6 glasses/week and –0·77 (0·62) for ≥1 glass/d in girls, Ptrend = 0·81; –0·94 (0·53) for non-consumers, –1·68 (0·52) for 1–3 glasses/month, –0·81 (0·38) for 1–6 glasses per week and –1·12 (0·61) for ≥1 glass/d in boys, Ptrend = 0·49.

Conclusion:

OJ consumption was favourably associated with height growth but unrelated to excess weight gain. OJ may be a useful alternative to whole fruit in the event that whole fruit intake is insufficient.


Type
Research paper
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Nutrition Society

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