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Temporary and longer term retention of acoustic information

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 June 2002

ISTVÁN WINKLER
Affiliation:
Institute for Psychology, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary Cognitive Brain Research Unit, Department of Psychology, Helsinki University, Helsinki, Finland
OLEG KORZYUKOV
Affiliation:
Cognitive Brain Research Unit, Department of Psychology, Helsinki University, Helsinki, Finland
VALENTINA GUMENYUK
Affiliation:
Cognitive Brain Research Unit, Department of Psychology, Helsinki University, Helsinki, Finland
NELSON COWAN
Affiliation:
Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri, USA
KLAUS LINKENKAER-HANSEN
Affiliation:
BioMag Laboratory, Engineering Centre, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland
RISTO J. ILMONIEMI
Affiliation:
BioMag Laboratory, Engineering Centre, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland
KIMMO ALHO
Affiliation:
Cognitive Brain Research Unit, Department of Psychology, Helsinki University, Helsinki, Finland
RISTO NÄÄTÄNEN
Affiliation:
Cognitive Brain Research Unit, Department of Psychology, Helsinki University, Helsinki, Finland BioMag Laboratory, Engineering Centre, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland
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Abstract

Though many studies suggest that fine acoustic details fade from memory after 15 s or even less, everyday experience tells us that the voice of a person or a musical instrument can be recognized long after it was last heard. We wished to determine whether tones leave a lasting memory trace using an experimental model of implicit recognition and testing whether exact pitch information can be retrieved even after 30 s. Event-related brain potentials demonstrated the survival of an accurate representation of tone pitch in the auditory cortex. This result provides a link between short-duration buffering and permanent storage of acoustic information.

Type
BRIEF REPORT
Copyright
2002 Society for Psychophysiological Research

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