Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-558cb97cc8-9njm9 Total loading time: 0.29 Render date: 2022-10-07T16:13:59.890Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Article contents

The perception of speech sounds by the human brain as reflected by the mismatch negativity (MMN) and its magnetic equivalent (MMNm)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 January 2001

RISTO NÄÄTÄNEN
Affiliation:
Cognitive Brain Research Unit (CBRU), Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Finland BioMag Laboratory, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland
Get access

Abstract

The present article outlines the contribution of the mismatch negativity (MMN), and its magnetic equivalent MMNm, to our understanding of the perception of speech sounds in the human brain. MMN data indicate that each sound, both speech and nonspeech, develops its neural representation corresponding to the percept of this sound in the neurophysiological substrate of auditory sensory memory. The accuracy of this representation, determining the accuracy of the discrimination between different sounds, can be probed with MMN separately for any auditory feature (e.g., frequency or duration) or stimulus type such as phonemes. Furthermore, MMN data show that the perception of phonemes, and probably also of larger linguistic units (syllables and words), is based on language-specific phonetic traces developed in the posterior part of the left-hemisphere auditory cortex. These traces serve as recognition models for the corresponding speech sounds in listening to speech. MMN studies further suggest that these language-specific traces for the mother tongue develop during the first few months of life. Moreover, MMN can also index the development of such traces for a foreign language learned later in life. MMN data have also revealed the existence of such neuronal populations in the human brain that can encode acoustic invariances specific to each speech sound, which could explain correct speech perception irrespective of the acoustic variation between the different speakers and word context.

Type
PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS, 1999
Copyright
2001 Society for Psychophysiological Research

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The perception of speech sounds by the human brain as reflected by the mismatch negativity (MMN) and its magnetic equivalent (MMNm)
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

The perception of speech sounds by the human brain as reflected by the mismatch negativity (MMN) and its magnetic equivalent (MMNm)
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

The perception of speech sounds by the human brain as reflected by the mismatch negativity (MMN) and its magnetic equivalent (MMNm)
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *