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Psychiatric community care: a Maharashtrian example1

  • Vieda Skultans
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References

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Frank, J. D. (1961). Persuasion and Healing. A Comparative Study of Psychotherapy. Oxford University Press: London.
Henry, E. O. (1977). A North Indian healer and the source of his power Social Science and Medicine 11, 309317.
Hitchcock, J. T. & Jones, R. L. (eds.) (1976). Spirit Possession in the Nepal Himalayas. Vikas: New Delhi.
Janzen, J. M. (1978). The Quest for Therapy in Lower Zaire. University of California Press: Berkeley.
Kakar, S. (1982). Shamans, Mystics and Doctors. A Psychological Enquiry into India and its Healing Traditions. Oxford University Press: Bombay.
Kapferer, B. (1983). A Celebration of Demons. Exorcism and the Aesthetics of Healing in Sri Lanka. Indiana University Press.
Kleinman, A. & Sung, L. (1979). Why do indigenous practitioners successfully heal. Social Science and Medicine 13B, 726.
Lévi-Strauss, C. (1963). Structural Anthropology (transl. Jacobson, C. and Schoepf, B. G.). Basic Books: New York.
Lewis, I. (1971). Ecstaíic Healing: An Anthropological Study of Spirit Possession and Shamanism. Penguin: Harmondsworth.
Obeyesekere, G. (1969). The ritual drama of the Sanni Demons: collective representations of disease in Ceylon. In Comparative Studies in Society and History vol. 2, pp. 174216.
Peters, L. (1981). Ecstacy and Healing in Nepal. Undena: Malibu.

Psychiatric community care: a Maharashtrian example1

  • Vieda Skultans

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