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Relationship between sleep and growth in patients with reversible somatotropin deficiency (psychosocial dwarfism)1

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 July 2009

Georg Wolff
Affiliation:
From the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Baltimore, Maryland, 21205, U.S.A.
John Money
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, 21205, U.S.A.

Synopsis

In a partly retrospective, partly follow-up study, 27 patients aged 1 year 10 months to 16 years 2 months with reversible somatotropin deficiency, showed a relationship between the rate of statural growth and sleep, graded as good, poor, or mixed. During periods of good sleep the overall growth rate averaged 1·04 cm per month, and during periods of poor sleep it averaged 0·34 cm per month (t=8·46, df=32, P<0·001). Presumably, good growth, good sleep, and optimal nocturnal somatotropin release intercorrelate in this syndrome of dwarfism, but the data with regard to nocturnal somatotropin release remain to be demonstrated empirically.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1973

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References

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