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Pre-treatment neurotransmitter metabolites and response to imipramine or amitriptyline treatment

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 July 2009

James H. Kocsis
Affiliation:
Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic, New York, New York, USA.
Charles L. Bowden
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas, USA.
John M. Davis
Affiliation:
Illinois State Psychiatric Institute, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
D. Eugene Redmond
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.
Israel Hanin
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.
Eli Robins
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, USA.

Synopsis

Preliminary data are presented from the NIMH Collaborative Study on the psychobiology of depression, biological studies, dealing with relationships between the pre-treatment levels of the neurotransmitter metabolites 3-methoxy-4-hydrophenethyleneglycol (MHPG), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and homovanillic acid (HVA) and the subsequent therapeutic response of depressed patients to imipramine or amitriptyline. Eighty-seven depressed patients were studied during pre-treatment and treatment periods. It has been found that (1) both low pre-treatment urinary MHPG and low CSF 5-HIAA values are associated with a response to imipramine; these relationships were not artefacts due to sex or age; (2) there were no significant relationships between pre-treatment urinary MHPG, CSF MHPG, 5-HIAA, or HVA values and the subsequent response, or failure of response, to amitriptyline; (3) there was not a bimodal distribution for CSF 5-HIAA. For both males and females, there were positive and statistically significant correlations between CSF MHPG and urinary MHPG; for the females, there were positive and significant correlations between both urinary and CSF MHPG and CSF 5-HIAA. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1982

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References

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