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Predictors of outcome in a fatigued population in primary care following a randomized controlled trial

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 February 2003

T. CHALDER
Affiliation:
Department of Psychological Medicine, and Department of Primary Care, Guy's, King's and St Thomas's School of Medicine and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Sciences, Royal Free and University College Medical School, London
E. GODFREY
Affiliation:
Department of Psychological Medicine, and Department of Primary Care, Guy's, King's and St Thomas's School of Medicine and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Sciences, Royal Free and University College Medical School, London
L. RIDSDALE
Affiliation:
Department of Psychological Medicine, and Department of Primary Care, Guy's, King's and St Thomas's School of Medicine and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Sciences, Royal Free and University College Medical School, London
M. KING
Affiliation:
Department of Psychological Medicine, and Department of Primary Care, Guy's, King's and St Thomas's School of Medicine and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Sciences, Royal Free and University College Medical School, London
S. WESSELY
Affiliation:
Department of Psychological Medicine, and Department of Primary Care, Guy's, King's and St Thomas's School of Medicine and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Sciences, Royal Free and University College Medical School, London

Abstract

Background. The objective of this study was to examine factors that predicted outcome in a chronically fatigued group of patients who were randomized to cognitive behaviour therapy or counselling in primary care.

Method. Illness perceptions, attributions, fatigue, disability and demographic variables were recorded at assessment and levels of fatigue and disability were measured at 6 months post randomization. Logistic regression was used to examine associations.

Results. Factors that predicted a poor outcome (four or more on the fatigue questionnaire) were: poor social adjustment at assessment; the patients self-report that they had never seen the GP for an emotional reason; a physical illness attribution; and, a long perceived future illness duration.

Conclusions. Patients who are more psychologically minded are more likely to improve with psychological treatments in primary care. General practitioners need to assess this before referring to an appropriate therapist.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2003 Cambridge University Press

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