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The impact of self-efficacy on first onset and prognosis of major depressive disorder: findings from a longitudinal study in a sample of Chinese first-year university students

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 August 2021

JianLi Wang*
Affiliation:
Shandong Key Laboratory of Behavioral Medicine, School of Mental Health, Jining Medical University, Jining272013, China The Royal's Institute of Mental Health Research, University of Ottawa, OttawaK1Z 7K4, Canada School of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Ottawa, OttawaK1Z 7K4, Canada
Debiao Liu
Affiliation:
Shandong Key Laboratory of Behavioral Medicine, School of Mental Health, Jining Medical University, Jining272013, China
Guoliang Li
Affiliation:
Shandong Key Laboratory of Behavioral Medicine, School of Mental Health, Jining Medical University, Jining272013, China
Jin Zhu
Affiliation:
Shandong Key Laboratory of Behavioral Medicine, School of Mental Health, Jining Medical University, Jining272013, China Shandong Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis & Treatment & Behavioral Interventions of Mental Disorders, Institute of Mental Health, Jining Medical University, Jining272013, China Center of Evidence-based Medicine, Jining Medical University, Jining272013, China
Song Yue
Affiliation:
Shandong Key Laboratory of Behavioral Medicine, School of Mental Health, Jining Medical University, Jining272013, China Department of Pathology, Weifang Medical University, Weifang261053, China
Xiang Li
Affiliation:
Shandong Key Laboratory of Behavioral Medicine, School of Mental Health, Jining Medical University, Jining272013, China
Ying Li
Affiliation:
Library of Jining Medical University, Jining272067, China
Yili Wu
Affiliation:
Shandong Key Laboratory of Behavioral Medicine, School of Mental Health, Jining Medical University, Jining272013, China Shandong Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis & Treatment & Behavioral Interventions of Mental Disorders, Institute of Mental Health, Jining Medical University, Jining272013, China Center of Evidence-based Medicine, Jining Medical University, Jining272013, China
Bin Wang
Affiliation:
The Second Affiliated Hospital of Jining Medical University, Jining272051, China
Yan Liu*
Affiliation:
Shandong Key Laboratory of Behavioral Medicine, School of Mental Health, Jining Medical University, Jining272013, China Shandong Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis & Treatment & Behavioral Interventions of Mental Disorders, Institute of Mental Health, Jining Medical University, Jining272013, China Center of Evidence-based Medicine, Jining Medical University, Jining272013, China
*
Authors for correspondence: JianLi Wang, E-mail: Jianli.Wang@theroyal.ca; Yan Liu, E-mail: hakunaly@163.com
Authors for correspondence: JianLi Wang, E-mail: Jianli.Wang@theroyal.ca; Yan Liu, E-mail: hakunaly@163.com

Abstract

Background

Self-efficacy is a pivotal factor in the etiology and prognosis of major depression. However, longitudinal studies on the relationship between self-efficacy and major depressive disorder (MDD) are scarce. The objectives were to investigate: (1) the associations between self-efficacy and the 1-year and 2-year risks of first onset of MDD and (2) the associations between self-efficacy and the 1-year and 2-year risks of the persistence/recurrence of MDD, in a sample of first-year university students.

Methods

We followed 8079 first-year university students for 2 years from April 2018 to October 2020. MDD was ascertained by the Chinese version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI-3.0) based on self-report. Self-efficacy was measured by the 10-item General Self-efficacy (GSE) scale. Random effect logistic regression modeling was used to estimate the associations.

Results

Among participants without a lifetime MDD, the data showed that participants with high baseline GSE scores were associated with a higher risk of first onset of MDD over 2 years [odds ratio (OR) 1.04, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01–1.08]. Among those with a lifetime MDD, participants with high baseline GSE scores were less likely to have had a MDD over 2 years (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.88–0.99) compared to others.

Conclusions

A high level of GSE may be protective of the risk of persistent or recurrent MDD. More longitudinal studies in university students are needed to further investigate the impact of GSE on the first onset of MDD.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press

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Footnotes

This article has been updated since its original publication. A correction notice detailing the update can be found here: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291721003627

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