Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-dfw9g Total loading time: 0.311 Render date: 2022-08-11T18:56:06.099Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Factors associated with satisfaction of inpatient psychiatric care: a cross country comparison

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 January 2019

Victoria Bird*
Affiliation:
Unit for Social and Community Psychiatry (World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre for Mental Health Services Development), Queen Mary University of London, London, UK
Elisabetta Miglietta
Affiliation:
Section of Psychiatry, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy
Domenico Giacco
Affiliation:
Unit for Social and Community Psychiatry (World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre for Mental Health Services Development), Queen Mary University of London, London, UK
Michael Bauer
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Carl Gustav Carus University Hospital, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany
Lauren Greenberg
Affiliation:
Pragmatic Clinical Trials Unit, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK
Vincent Lorant
Affiliation:
Institute of Health and Society IRSS, Université Catholique de Louvain, Bruxelles, Belgium
Jacek Moskalewicz
Affiliation:
Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology, Warsaw, Poland
Pablo Nicaise
Affiliation:
Institute of Health and Society IRSS, Université Catholique de Louvain, Bruxelles, Belgium
Andrea Pfennig
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Carl Gustav Carus University Hospital, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany
Mirella Ruggeri
Affiliation:
Section of Psychiatry, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy
Marta Welbel
Affiliation:
Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology, Warsaw, Poland
Stefan Priebe
Affiliation:
Unit for Social and Community Psychiatry (World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre for Mental Health Services Development), Queen Mary University of London, London, UK
*
Author for correspondence: Victoria Bird, E-mail: v.j.bird@qmul.ac.uk

Abstract

Background

Patient satisfaction is a key indicator of inpatient care quality and is associated with clinical outcomes following admission. Different patient characteristics have been inconsistently linked with satisfaction. This study aims to overcome previous limitations by assessing which patient characteristics are associated with satisfaction within a large study of psychiatric inpatients conducted across five European countries.

Methods

All patients with a diagnosis of psychotic (F2), affective (F3) or anxiety/somataform (F4) disorder admitted to 57 psychiatric inpatient units in Belgium, Germany, Italy, Poland and the UK were included. Data were collected from medical records and face-to-face interviews, with patients approached within 2 days of admission. Satisfaction with inpatient care was measured on the Client Assessment of Treatment Scale.

Results

Higher satisfaction scores were associated with being older, employed, living with others, having a close friend, less severe illness and a first admission. In contrast, higher education levels, comorbid personality disorder and involuntary admission were associated with lower levels of satisfaction. Although the same patient characteristics predicted satisfaction within the five countries, there were significant differences in overall satisfaction scores across countries. Compared to other countries, patients in the UK were significantly less satisfied with their inpatient care.

Conclusions

Having a better understanding of patient satisfaction may enable services to improve the quality of care provided as well as clinical outcomes for all patients. Across countries, the same patient characteristics predict satisfaction, suggesting that similar analytical frameworks can and should be used when assessing satisfaction both nationally and internationally.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2019

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Csipke, E, Williams, P, Rose, D, Koeser, L, McCrone, P, Wykes, T and Craig, T (2016) Following the Francis report: investigating patient experience of mental health in-patient care. The British Journal of Psychiatry 209, 3539.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dimitri, G, Giacco, D, Bauer, M, Bird, VJ, Greenberg, L, Lasalvia, A, Lorant, V, Moskalewicz, J, Nicaise, P, Pfennig, A, Ruggeri, M, Welbel, M and Priebe, S (2018) Predictors of length of stay in psychiatric inpatient units: does their effect vary across countries? European Psychiatry 48, 612.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Evans, J, Rose, D, Flach, C, Csipke, E, Glossop, H, McCrone, P, Craig, T and Wykes, T (2012) VOICE: developing a new measure of service users' perceptions of inpatient care, using a participatory methodology. Journal of Mental Health 21, 5771.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fagerland, MW (2012) t-Tests, non-parametric tests, and large studies – a paradox of statistical practice? BMC Medical Research Methodology 12, 78.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fiorillo, A, De Rosa, C, Del Vecchio, V, Jurjanz, L, Schnall, K, Onchev, G, Alexiev, S, Raboch, J, Kalisova, L, Mastrogianni, A, Georgiadou, E, Solomon, Z, Dembinskas, A, Raskauskas, V, Nawka, P, Nawka, A, Kiejna, A, Hadrys, T, Torres-Gonzales, F, Mayoral, F, Bjorkdahl, A, Kjellin, L, Priebe, S, Maj, M and Kallert, T (2011) How to improve clinical practice on involuntary hospital admissions of psychiatric patients: suggestions from the EUNOMIA study. European Psychiatry 26, 201207.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fiorillo, A, Giacco, D, De Rosa, C, Kallert, T, Katsakou, C, Onchev, G, Raboch, J, Mastrogianni, A, Del Vecchio, V, Luciano, M, Catapano, F, Dembinskas, A, Nawka, P, Kiejna, A, Torres-Gonzales, F, Kjellin, L, Maj, M and Priebe, S (2012) Patient characteristics and symptoms associated with perceived coercion during hospital treatment. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica 125, 460467.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Guy, W (1976) ECDEU Assessment Manual for Psychopharmacology. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.Google Scholar
Kallert, TW, Glockner, M, Onchev, G, Raboch, J, Karastergiou, A, Solomon, Z, Magliano, L, Dembinskas, A, Kiejna, A, Nawka, P, Torres-Gonzalez, F, Priebe, S and Kjellin, L (2005) The EUNOMIA project on coercion in psychiatry: study design and preliminary data. World Psychiatry 4, 168172.Google ScholarPubMed
Kallert, TW, Katsakou, C, Adamowski, T, Dembinskas, A, Fiorillo, A, Kjellin, L, Mastrogianni, A, Nawka, P, Onchev, G, Raboch, J, Schutzwohl, M, Solomon, Z, Torres-Gonzalez, F, Bremner, S and Priebe, S (2011) Coerced hospital admission and symptom change – a prospective observational multi-centre study. PLoS ONE 6, e28191.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Katsakou, C, Bowers, L, Amos, T, Morriss, R, Rose, D, Wykes, T and Priebe, S (2010) Coercion and treatment satisfaction among involuntary patients. Psychiatric Services 61, 286292.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Krupchanka, D, Khalifeh, H, Abdulmalik, J, Ardila-Gomez, S, Armiya'u, AY, Banjac, V, Baranov, A, Bezborodovs, N, Brecic, P, Cavajda, Z, de Girolamo, G, Denisenko, M, Dickens, HA, Dujmovic, J, Ergovic Novotny, D, Fedotov, I, Fernandez, MA, Frankova, I, Gasparovic, M, Giurgi-Oncu, C, Grahovac, T, James, BO, Jomli, R, Kekin, I, Knez, R, Lanfredi, M, Lassman, F, Mehta, N, Nacef, F, Nawka, A, Nemirovsky, M, Ola, BA, Oshodi, YO, Ouali, U, Peharda, T, Razic Pavicic, A, Rojnic Kuzman, M, Roventa, C, Shamenov, R, Smirnova, D, Smoljanic, D, Spikina, A, Thornicroft, A, Tomicevic, M, Vidovic, D, Williams, P, Yakovleva, Y, Zhabenko, O, Zhilyaeva, T, Zivkovic, M, Thornicroft, G and Sartorius, N (2017) Satisfaction with psychiatric in-patient care as rated by patients at discharge from hospitals in 11 countries. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology 52, 9891003.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Miglietta, E, Belessiotis-Richards, C, Ruggeri, M and Priebe, S (2018) Scales for assessing patient satisfaction with mental health care: a systematic review. Journal of Psychiatric Research 100, 3346.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mindell, JS, Giampaoli, S, Goesswald, A, Kamtsiuris, P, Mann, C, Mannisto, S, Morgan, K, Shelton, NJ, Verschuren, WM and Tolonen, H (2015) Sample selection, recruitment and participation rates in health examination surveys in Europe – experience from seven national surveys. BMC Medical Research Methodology 15, 78.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
NatCen (2016) Satisfaction With Work and Work-Life Balance. London, UK: NatCen.Google Scholar
O'Donoghue, B, Lyne, J, Hill, M, O'Rourke, L, Daly, S, Larkin, C, Feeney, L and O'Callaghan, E (2011) Perceptions of involuntary admission and risk of subsequent readmission at one-year follow-up: the influence of insight and recovery style. Journal of Mental Health 20, 249259.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Priebe, S and Gruyters, T (1995) Patients' assessment of treatment predicting outcome. Schizophrenia Bulletin 21, 8794.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Priebe, S, Katsakou, C, Amos, T, Leese, M, Morriss, R, Rose, D, Wykes, T and Yeeles, K (2009) Patients' views and readmissions 1 year after involuntary hospitalisation. British Journal of Psychiatry 194, 4954.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Priebe, S, Barnicot, K, McCabe, R, Kiejna, A, Nawka, P, Raboch, J, Schutzwohl, M and Kallert, T (2011 a) Patients' subjective initial response and the outcome of inpatient and day hospital treatment. European Psychiatry 26, 408413.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Priebe, S, Katsakou, C, Yeeles, K, Amos, T, Morriss, R, Wang, D and Wykes, T (2011 b) Predictors of clinical and social outcomes following involuntary hospital admission: a prospective observational study. European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience 261, 377386.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rees, G, Andresen, S and Bradshaw, J (eds) (2016) Children's Views on Their Lives and Well-Being in 16 Countries: A Report on the Children's Worlds Survey of Children Aged Eight Years old, 2013–2015. York, UK: Children's Worlds Project (ISCWeB).Google Scholar
Reininghaus, U and Priebe, S (2012) Measuring patient-reported outcomes in psychosis: conceptual and methodological review. British Journal of Psychiatry 201, 262267.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Richardson, M, Katsakou, C and Priebe, S (2011) Association of treatment satisfaction and psychopathological sub-syndromes among involuntary patients with psychotic disorders. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology 46, 695702.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ruggeri, M, Nose, M, Bonetto, C, Cristofalo, D, Lasalvia, A, Salvi, G, Stefani, B, Malchiodi, F and Tansella, M (2005) Changes and predictors of change in objective and subjective quality of life: multiwave follow-up study in community psychiatric practice. British Journal of Psychiatry 187, 121130.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Smith, D, Roche, E, O'Loughlin, K, Brennan, D, Madigan, K, Lyne, J, Feeney, L and O'Donoghue, B (2014) Satisfaction with services following voluntary and involuntary admission. Journal of Mental Health 23, 3845.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
van der Post, LF, Peen, J, Visch, I, Mulder, CL, Beekman, AT and Dekker, JJ (2014) Patient perspectives and the risk of compulsory admission: the Amsterdam Study of Acute Psychiatry V. The International Journal of Social Psychiatry 60, 125133.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Vermeulen, JM, Schirmbeck, NF, van Tricht, MJ and de Haan, L (2018) Satisfaction of psychotic patients with care and its value to predict outcomes. European Psychiatry 47, 6066.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Woodward, S, Berry, K and Bucci, S (2017) A systematic review of factors associated with service user satisfaction with psychiatric inpatient services. Journal of Psychiatric Research 92, 8193.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wykes, T, Csipke, E, Williams, P, Koeser, L, Nash, S, Rose, D, Craig, T and McCrone, P (2018) Improving patient experiences of mental health inpatient care: a randomised controlled trial. Psychological Medicine 48, 488497.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
7
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Factors associated with satisfaction of inpatient psychiatric care: a cross country comparison
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Factors associated with satisfaction of inpatient psychiatric care: a cross country comparison
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Factors associated with satisfaction of inpatient psychiatric care: a cross country comparison
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *