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Evaluating the interactive effects of dietary habits and human gut microbiome on the risks of depression and anxiety

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 January 2022

Yao Yao
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission, School of Public Health, Health Science Center, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China
Xin Qi
Affiliation:
Precision Medicine Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, P. R. China
Yumeng Jia
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission, School of Public Health, Health Science Center, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China
Jing Ye
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission, School of Public Health, Health Science Center, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China
Xiaomeng Chu
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission, School of Public Health, Health Science Center, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China
Yan Wen
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission, School of Public Health, Health Science Center, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China
Bolun Cheng
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission, School of Public Health, Health Science Center, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China
Shiqiang Cheng
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission, School of Public Health, Health Science Center, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China
Li Liu
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission, School of Public Health, Health Science Center, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China
Chujun Liang
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission, School of Public Health, Health Science Center, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China
Cuiyan Wu
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission, School of Public Health, Health Science Center, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China
Xi Wang
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission, School of Public Health, Health Science Center, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China
Yujie Ning
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission, School of Public Health, Health Science Center, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China
Sen Wang
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission, School of Public Health, Health Science Center, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China
Feng Zhang*
Affiliation:
Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission, School of Public Health, Health Science Center, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China
*
Author for correspondence: Feng Zhang, E-mail: fzhxjtu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

Abstract

Background

Gut microbiome and dietary patterns have been suggested to be associated with depression/anxiety. However, limited effort has been made to explore the effects of possible interactions between diet and microbiome on the risks of depression and anxiety.

Methods

Using the latest genome-wide association studies findings in gut microbiome and dietary habits, polygenic risk scores (PRSs) analysis of gut microbiome and dietary habits was conducted in the UK Biobank cohort. Logistic/linear regression models were applied for evaluating the associations for gut microbiome-PRS, dietary habits-PRS, and their interactions with depression/anxiety status and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9)/Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) score by R software.

Results

We observed 51 common diet–gut microbiome interactions shared by both PHQ score and depression status, such as overall beef intake × genus Sporobacter [hurdle binary (HB)] (PPHQ = 7.88 × 10−4, Pdepression status = 5.86 × 10−4); carbohydrate × genus Lactococcus (HB) (PPHQ = 0.0295, Pdepression status = 0.0150). We detected 41 common diet–gut microbiome interactions shared by GAD score and anxiety status, such as sugar × genus Parasutterella (rank normal transformed) (PGAD = 5.15 × 10−3, Panxiety status = 0.0347); tablespoons of raw vegetables per day × family Coriobacteriaceae (HB) (PGAD = 6.02 × 10−4, Panxiety status = 0.0345). Some common significant interactions shared by depression and anxiety were identified, such as overall beef intake × genus Sporobacter (HB).

Conclusions

Our study results expanded our understanding of how to comprehensively consider the relationships for dietary habits–gut microbiome interactions with depression and anxiety.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press

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Footnotes

*

The two authors contributed equally to this work.

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Evaluating the interactive effects of dietary habits and human gut microbiome on the risks of depression and anxiety
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Evaluating the interactive effects of dietary habits and human gut microbiome on the risks of depression and anxiety
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Evaluating the interactive effects of dietary habits and human gut microbiome on the risks of depression and anxiety
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