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The 12-month prevalence of psychotic experiences and their association with clinical outcomes in Hong Kong: an epidemiological and a 2-year follow up studies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 May 2020

Sherry Kit Wa Chan*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong The State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, The University of Hong Kong
Kaspar Kit Wai Lee
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Veronica Hei Yan Chan*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong
Herbert H. Pang
Affiliation:
School of Public Health, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong
Corine Sau Man Wong
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong
Christy Lai Ming Hui
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong
Wing Chung Chang
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong The State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, The University of Hong Kong
Edwin Ho Ming Lee
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong
Wai Chi Chan*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong
Eric Fuk Chi Cheung
Affiliation:
Kwong Wah Hospital, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Helen Fung Kum Chiu
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Tin Po Chiang
Affiliation:
Castle Peak Hospital, Hong Kong
Ming Lam
Affiliation:
Castle Peak Hospital, Hong Kong
Joseph Tak Fai Lau
Affiliation:
Center for Health Behaviours Research, JC School of Public Health and Primary Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Roger Man King Ng
Affiliation:
Kowloon Hospital, Hong Kong SAR, Hong Kong
Se Fong Hung
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong
Linda Chiu Wa Lam
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
Eric Yu Hai Chen
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong The State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, The University of Hong Kong
*
Author for correspondence: Sherry Kit Wa Chan, E-mail: kwsherry@gmail.com
Author for correspondence: Sherry Kit Wa Chan, E-mail: kwsherry@gmail.com
Author for correspondence: Sherry Kit Wa Chan, E-mail: kwsherry@gmail.com

Abstract

Background

The relationship between the subtypes of psychotic experiences (PEs) and common mental health symptoms remains unclear. The current study aims to establish the 12-month prevalence of PEs in a representative sample of community-dwelling Chinese population in Hong Kong and explore the relationship of types of PEs and common mental health symptoms.

Method

This is a population-based two-phase household survey of Chinese population in Hong Kong aged 16–75 (N = 5719) conducted between 2010 and 2013 and a 2-year follow-up study of PEs positive subjects (N = 152). PEs were measured with Psychosis Screening Questionnaire (PSQ) and subjects who endorsed any item on the PSQ without a clinical diagnosis of psychotic disorder were considered as PE-positive. Types of PEs were characterized using a number of PEs (single v. multiple) and latent class analysis. All PE-positive subjects were assessed with common mental health symptoms and suicidal ideations at baseline and 2-year follow-up. PE status was also assessed at 2-year follow-up.

Results

The 12-month prevalence of PEs in Hong Kong was 2.7% with 21.1% had multiple PEs. Three latent classes of PEs were identified: hallucination, paranoia and mixed. Multiple PEs and hallucination latent class of PEs were associated with higher levels of common mental health symptoms. PE persistent rate at 2-year follow-up was 15.1%. Multiple PEs was associated with poorer mental health at 2-year follow-up.

Conclusions

Results highlighted the transient and heterogeneous nature of PEs, and that multiple PEs and hallucination subtype of PEs may be specific indices of poorer common mental health.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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