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        Special interest sessions: some thoughts
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        Special interest sessions: some thoughts
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Sir: The correspondence from McIntosh (Psychiatric Bulletin, January 2002, 26, 37) on the use of her special interest sessions for a placement in public health was a welcome sight for specialist registrars such as myself because unless a training scheme has special interest sessions already established, this is often left to our imagination and resourcefulness, so one is grateful for any inspiration.

A recent study (Stephenson & Puffett, Psychiatric Bulletin, May 2000, 124, 187-188) revealed that some trainees have real problems in knowing what to do about these sessions. Something along the lines of an internet database of pooled experiences might be valuable and I would be happy to be contacted by any interested parties.

Finally, we also need to be aware that placements outside of our employing trusts may not be covered either by trust indemnity or by our defence organisations, and it may be necessary to negotiate a contract with the trust our sessions are with.