Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access
  • Open access

Figures:

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Richard Ropner
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Richard Ropner
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Richard Ropner
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

Richard (Dick) Ropner was born on 13 April 1941 in Edinburgh, where he was to study medicine; he graduated in 1965. Before entering psychiatry he gained a wide range of clinical experience, which included a year as an intern in the USA, working as a doctor in Nigeria (where he had to flee when Biafran troops invaded Western Nigeria) and, later, assisting in general practice in Norfolk and Guernsey.

Dick's psychiatry training began at St Pancras Hospital, and then continued on the Oxford Psychiatric Rotational Training Scheme. He obtained the DPM in 1972 and after doing locum work at Broadmoor Hospital, he became a consultant in Gloucestershire, where he worked for the rest of his professional life.

Dick made wide contributions to psychiatry locally. He developed the alcohol treatment service and was involved in the planning of and the move to community-based services. He had an interest in psychosocial medicine, gave psychiatric advice to the local alcohol clinic, and established a gender dysphoria clinic.

In recent years he was chair of the local medical staff committee, a role he continued until 2 weeks before his death. He was also one of the local ‘ Wise Men’ and provided treatment and care to local clinical staff with emotional problems.

All who trained or subsequently worked with Dick would agree that he was a most interesting psychiatrist, often expressing views which challenged current dogma. Local clinicians will remember him not only for his caring approach to patients but also for his ability to capture the essence of his patients’ problems and circumstances, and to relay this in highly colourful prose. Dick's many friends will remember him for his quirky humour, the way he loved to pull their legs with disarming seriousness, accompanied by a characteristic wink, and, most of all, for his good nature, warmth and generosity.

Some months ago Dick was diagnosed as suffering from pancreatic cancer, but despite this, he continued to live life to the full, yet with a calm acceptance of the inevitable outcome.

The wide affection felt for Dick was reflected in the very large congregation, including former patients, who attended the service to celebrate his life.

He leaves his much loved family – his wife Janet (a consultant haematologist), a son, James (a general practitioner registrar) and a daughter Victoria (a lawyer). Dick's first grandchild was born 2 months after his death.