Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access
  • Open access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Psychological therapies in psychiatry and primary care
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Psychological therapies in psychiatry and primary care
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Psychological therapies in psychiatry and primary care
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

The aim of this report is to improve the provision of psychological therapies to people with mental and physical disorders in both primary and secondary care settings. It provides information and guidance about psychological therapies that should be useful to psychiatrists, general practitioners, employers and commissioners of services.

The report identifies key themes and principles, alongside ways to develop and maintain psychological services that meet satisfactory standards. It also sets out a number of benchmarks, with assessments of how well-recommended aims and standards are being accomplished. It provides advice for commissioners of the service.

In all settings, psychological therapies should be delivered by a workforce that is psychologically minded and trained in an appropriate range of psychological therapies. Key implications are set out for future medical training. The report may also assist those contemplating careers in general practice, or in psychiatry (which used to be known as ‘psychological medicine’) in weighing up the opportunities available for the holistic care of people with physical short- and long-term conditions as well as mental illness.

College Report CR 151, June 2008, £10, 45 pp.