Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access
  • Open access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        [No Title]
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        [No Title]
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        [No Title]
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

I agree with Dinniss et al (Psychiatric Bulletin, March 2007, 31, ) that an MSc in Clinical Education is a worthwhile qualification, as there will be increasing pressure on senior clinicians to take an active part in teaching medical students and trainees. As society expects the healthcare system to be more and more transparent, clinicians will be held more accountable for their teaching and workplace-based assessments.

Learning to teach well means questioning the effectiveness of some of the old teaching methods, exploring new ideas and trying out new methods in different situations. Having started the MSc in Clinical Education in the past year, I find the experience extremely rewarding and enlightening. Being a product of the ‘old system’ of medical education where didactic teaching (lecture-based) dominated the curriculum, I found the principles of adult learning and the various techniques of small-group teaching quite fascinating. The feedback I received from medical students about the effectiveness of these techniques has been encouraging.

There is no doubt that there is an increasing demand for clinicians to deliver high-quality education, and a qualification in clinical education could become an essential rather than a desirable requirement for future consultant posts in the National Health Service.