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There Was a Crooked Man(uscript): A Not-So-Serious Look at the Serious Subject of Plagiarism

  • Kevin T. McGuire (a1)

Abstract

The problem of plagiarism by political scientists has not received much attention. The incidence of plagiarism, however, may be greater than one would think. In this article, I offer a humorous look at what happened when a manuscript of mine was plagiarized. Based on my experience, I offer some suggestions on how scholars might detect and prevent plagiarism.

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References

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There Was a Crooked Man(uscript): A Not-So-Serious Look at the Serious Subject of Plagiarism

  • Kevin T. McGuire (a1)

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