Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Research Creativity and Productivity in Political Science: A Research Agenda for Understanding Alternative Career Paths and Attitudes Toward Professional Work in the Profession

  • Kim Quaile Hill (a1)

Abstract

A growing body of research investigates the factors that enhance the research productivity and creativity of political scientists. This work provides a foundation for future research, but it has not addressed some of the most promising causal hypotheses in the general scientific literature on this topic. This article explicates the latter hypotheses, a typology of scientific career paths that distinguishes how scientific careers vary over time with respect to creative ambitions and achievements, and a research agenda based on the preceding components for investigation of the publication success of political scientists.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Research Creativity and Productivity in Political Science: A Research Agenda for Understanding Alternative Career Paths and Attitudes Toward Professional Work in the Profession
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Research Creativity and Productivity in Political Science: A Research Agenda for Understanding Alternative Career Paths and Attitudes Toward Professional Work in the Profession
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Research Creativity and Productivity in Political Science: A Research Agenda for Understanding Alternative Career Paths and Attitudes Toward Professional Work in the Profession
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

References

Hide All
Amabile, Teresa M. 1996. Creativity in Context. Boulder, CO: Westview.
Amabile, Teresa M., Hennessey, Beth A., and Grossman, Barbara S.. 1986. “Social Influences on Creativity: The Effects of Contracted-for Reward.” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 50 (1): 1423.
Amabile, Teresa M., Hill, Karl G., Hennessey, Beth A., and Tighe, Elizabeth M.. 1994. “The Work Preference Inventory: Assessing Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivational Considerations.” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 66 (5): 950–67.
American Political Science Association. 2018. Trends in Degrees Awarded in the Social Sciences . Washington, DC.
Cole, Stephen. 1979. “Age and Scientific Performance.” American Journal of Sociology 84 (January): 958–77.
Dion, Michelle L., Sumner, Jane Lawrence, and Mitchell, Sara McLaughlin. 2018. “Gendered Citation Patterns across Political Science and Social Science Methodology Fields.” Political Analysis 26 (July): 312–27.
Djupe, Paul A., Amy Erica Smith, and Anand E. Sokhey. 2019. “Explaining Gender in the Journals: How Submission Practices Affect Publication Patterns in Political Science.” PS: Political Science & Politics 52 (January): 7177.
Feist, Gregory J. 1993. “A Structural Model of Scientific Eminence.” Psychological Science 4 (November): 366–71.
Feist, Gregory J. 2014. “Psychometric Studies of Scientific Talent and Eminence.” In The Wiley Handbook of Genius, ed. Simonton, Dean Keith, 6286. Chichester, UK: Wiley.
Galenson, David W. 2006. Old Masters and Young Geniuses. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
Galenson, David W. 2010. “Late Bloomers in the Arts and Sciences: Answers and Questions.” Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, Working Paper 15838.
Grosul, Maya, and Feist, Gregory J.. 2014. “The Creative Person in Science.” Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts 8 (1): 30–43.
Hesli, Vicki L., and Lee, Jae Mook. 2011. “Why Do Some of Our Colleagues Publish More Than Others?PS: Political Science & Politics 44 (April): 393–408.
Holmes, Frederic Lawrence. 2004. Investigative Pathways. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.
John, Oliver P., Naumann, Laura P., and Soto, Christopher J.. 2008. “Paradigm Shift to the Big Five Trait Taxonomy: History, Measurement, and Conceptual Issues.” In Handbook of Personality: Theory and Research, ed. John, Oliver P., Robins, Richard W., and Pervin, Lawrence A. 114–58. New York: Guilford.
Klingemann, Hans-Dieter, Grofman, Bernard, and Campagna, Janet. 1989. “The Political Science 400: Citations by Ph.D. Cohort and by Ph.D.-Granting Institution.” PS: Political Science & Politics 22 (June): 258–70.
Masuoka, Natalie, Grofman, Bernard, and Feld, Scott L.. 2007a. “The Political Science 400: A Twenty-Year Update.” PS: Political Science & Politics 40 (January): 133–45.
Masuoka, Natalie, Grofman, Bernard, and Feld, Scott L.. 2007b. “Ranking Departments: A Comparison of Alternative Approaches.” PS: Political Science & Politics 40 (July): 531–37.
McGonagle, Katherine A., Schoeni, Robert F., Sastry, Narayan, and Freedman, Vicki A.. 2012. “The Panel Study of Income Dynamics: Overview, Recent Innovations, and Potential for Life Course Research.” Longitudinal and Life Course Studies 3 (2): 268–84.
Roettger, Walter B. 1978. “Strata and Stability: Reputations of American Political Scientists.” PS: Political Science & Politics 11 (Winter): 612.
Sanbonmatsu, Kira, Assendelft, Laura van, Fortna, Page, Gay, Claudine, and Garcia-Bedolla, Lisa. Forthcoming. “Analyzing Career Progress of Five Graduate-Program Student Cohorts from the 1990s.” Report to APSA’s Presidential Task Force on Women’s Advancement in the Profession. Washington, DC: American Political Science Association.
Simonton, Dean Keith. 1988. Scientific Genius. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Simonton, Dean Keith. 2014. “Historiometric Studies of Genius.” In The Wiley Handbook of Genius, ed. Simonton, Dean Keith, 87106. Chichester, UK: Wiley.
Solomon, Maynard. 1998. Beethoven . London: G. Schirmer, Inc.
Somit, Albert, and Tanenhaus, Joseph. 1964. American Political Science: A Profile of a Discipline. New York: Atherton Press.

Research Creativity and Productivity in Political Science: A Research Agenda for Understanding Alternative Career Paths and Attitudes Toward Professional Work in the Profession

  • Kim Quaile Hill (a1)

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed