Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Aquí Estamos? A Survey of Latino Portrayal in Introductory U.S. Government and Politics Textbooks

  • Jessica Lavariega Monforti (a1) and Adam McGlynn (a1)

Abstract

The breadth of material covered in introductory U.S. government and politics survey courses creates a situation in which the textbooks used may serve as the primary source of information students receive about the country's political system. At the same time, their content represents a conscious choice by the authors, editors, and publishers of these textbooks regarding what topics and content are necessary and worthy of publication, which socializes students to accept particular viewpoints of the formation and operation of the U.S. government. Oftentimes, the information presented in textbooks across subdisciplines ignores the political experiences and influence of racial, ethnic, and other minority groups. We test this premise by engaging in a study of 29 introductory U.S. government and politics textbooks to assess the level of coverage and treatment of Latinos/as, the fastest growing racial/ethnic group in the country. We find that the discussion of Latinos in these textbooks is incredibly brief and often limited to the civil rights chapters. Furthermore, Latinos are primarily mentioned in the discussion of immigration, while their overall contributions to the political development of the United States are largely ignored.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Aquí Estamos? A Survey of Latino Portrayal in Introductory U.S. Government and Politics Textbooks
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Aquí Estamos? A Survey of Latino Portrayal in Introductory U.S. Government and Politics Textbooks
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Aquí Estamos? A Survey of Latino Portrayal in Introductory U.S. Government and Politics Textbooks
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

References

Hide All
Apple, Michael W., and Christian Smith, Linda K., eds. 1991. The Politics of the Textbook. New York and London: Routledge.
Carrasquillo, Angela. 1994. “A Rationale for Hispanic Representation in Instructional Materials.” Journal of Educational Issues of Language Minority Students 14: 115–26.
Cruz, Bárbara C. 1994. “Stereotypes of Latin Americans Perpetuated in Secondary School History Textbooks.” Latino Studies Journal 5 (1): 5167.
Cruz, Bárbara C. 2002. “Don Juan and Rebels under Palm Trees: Depictions of Latin Americans in U.S. History Textbooks.” Critique of Anthropology 22 (3): 323–42.
Down, Graham A. 1988. “Preface.” In A Conspiracy of Good Intentions: America's Textbook Fiasco, ed. Tyson-Bernstein, Harrietiii–viii. Washington, DC: Council for Basic Education.
Hannan, Andrew. 1987. “Racism, Politics and the Curriculum.” British Journal of Sociology of Education 8 (2): 119–33.
Hatcher, Richard. 1985. “On ‘Education for Racial Equality’Multiracial Education 13 (1): 3046.
Lavariega Monforti, Jessica. 2006–2007. “Rhetoric or Meaningful Identifiers? Latina/os and Panethnicity?Latino/a Research Review 6 (1–2): 732.
Lavariega Monforti, Jessica, and Michelson, Melissa. 2008. “Diagnosing the Leaky Pipeline: Continuing Barriers to the Retention of Latinas and Latinos in Political Science.” PS: Political Science and Politics 41 (1): 161–66.
Lavariega Monforti, Jessica, and Bedolla, Lisa García. 2009. “Policy Positions and Partisanship among Mexican and Cuban Origin Populations in the United States.” In The Changing Face of America: Politics of Race, Ethnicity and Religion in Multicultural America, ed. Martinez-Ebers, Valerie and Dorraj, Manochehr, 138–52. New York: Oxford University Press.
National Association of Hispanic Journalists. 2006. Network Brownout Report: The Portrayal of Latinos and Latino issues on Network Television News. Washington, DC: National Association of Hispanic Journalists.
Novkov, Julie, and Gossett, Charles. 2007. “Survey of Textbooks for Teaching Introduction to U.S. Politics: (How) Do They See Us? PS: Political Science and Politics 40 (2): 393–98.
O'Connor, Karen, Sabato, Larry J., Keith, Gary A., and Haag, Stefan D.. 2009. American Government: Roots and Reform. 2009 Texas ed. New York: Longman.
Parks, Kathrin. 2007. “Encountering Racism in the Ivory Towers: A Qualitative Analysis of Latino Student Experiences in Higher Education.” Ph.D. diss., Texas A&M University.
Richardson, Valerie. 2009. “School Head Fights ‘ethnic chauvinism’ in Arizona.” Washington Times, July 29, B01.
Rodriguez, Joseph A., and Ruiz, Vicki L.. 2000. “At Loose Ends: Twentieth-Century Latinos in Current United States History Textbooks.” Journal of American History 86 (4): 1689–99.
Sleeter, Christine E., and Grant, Carl A.. 1991. “Race, Class, Gender, and Disability in Current Textbooks.” In The Politics of the Textbook, ed. Apple, Michael W. and Christian-Smith, Linda K., 78110. New York: Routledge.
Torres, Zahira. 2009. “State Board to Keep César Chávez and Thurgood Marshall in Its Curriculum.” El Paso Times, September 18. http://www.elpasotimes.com/education/ci_13362953
Tyson-Bernstein, Harriet. 1988. A Conspiracy of Good Intentions: America's Textbook Fiasco. Washington, DC: Council for Basic Education.
Wallace, Sherri L., and Allen, Marcus D.. 2008. “Survey of African American Portrayal in Introductory Textbooks in American Government/Politics: A Report of the APSA Standing Committee on the Status of Blacks in the Profession.” PS: Political Science and Politics 41 (1): 153–60.

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed