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The NIMH MATRICS Initiative: Development of a Consensus Cognitive Battery

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 October 2006

Robert S. Kern
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Veterans Affairs VISN 22 Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA; Email:rkern@ucla.edu; mgreen@ucla.edu; marder@ucla.edu
Michael F. Green
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Veterans Affairs VISN 22 Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA; Email:rkern@ucla.edu; mgreen@ucla.edu; marder@ucla.edu
Stephen R. Marder
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Veterans Affairs VISN 22 Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA; Email:rkern@ucla.edu; mgreen@ucla.edu; marder@ucla.edu

Extract

ABSTRACT

A key obstacle to the development of new drugs to treat the cognitive deficits of schizophrenia was the absence of a standard by which to measure their efficacy. Before granting approval for any new drug for this condition, the US Food and Drug Administration wanted a standard cognitive endpoint based on a broad consensus-based method. To address this obstacle, the Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (MATRICS) intiative oversaw a process to develop a consensus neurocognitive battery. Its development included a ten-step process that is described in this article.

Type
Review Article
Copyright
© 2007 Cambridge University Press

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