Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

A historical review of marine fish disease studies with special reference to Scotland

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 December 2011

Ronald J. Roberts
Affiliation:
Institute of Aquaculture, University of Stirling, Scotland
Get access

Synopsis

The study of marine fish diseases has been directly related in its development to the significance of the fisheries or latterly aquaculture systems involved with epizootics. In this respect, Scotland has played a central role because of the importance of specific diseases of salmon which have been especially prevalent in Scotland, and the advanced state of its basic veterinary and medical expertise. This has been particularly important in the past, when very little information was available and extrapolation from higher animal studies was the only relevant approach.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Royal Society of Edinburgh 1982

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Agius, C. 1980. Phylogenetic development of melano-macrophage centres in fish. J. Zool. 191, 1131.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Aldrovani, U. 1613. De piscibus. Bologna.Google Scholar
Anderson, C. D., Roberts, R. J., MacKenzie, K. and MacVicar, A. H. 1976. The hepato-renal syndrome in cultured turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.). J. Fish Biol. 8, 331341.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bell, W. 1793. Description of a species of Chaetodon called by the Malays Eccan bonna. Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. Lond. 83, 79.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buchanan, J. S. 1978. Cytological studies on a new species of rickettsia found in association with a phage in the digestive gland of the marine bivalve mollusc, Tellina tenuis da Costa. J. Fish Dis. 1, 2743.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ellis, A. E., Hastings, T. S. and Munro, A. L. S. 1981. The role of Aeromonas salmonicida extracellular products in the pathology of furunculosis. J. Fish Dis. 4, 4151.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hofer, B. 1904. Handbuch der Fischkrankheiten. München.Google Scholar
Johnston, J. 1906. On a myxosporidian infection of Gadus esmarkii (with a note on the identification of the parasite by Woodcock, H. M.). Proc. Lpool Biol. Soc. 20, 304–348.Google Scholar
Johnston, J. 1927. Diseased conditions offish. Proc. Lpool Biol. Soc. 41, 162167.Google Scholar
Mackie, T. J., Arkwright, J. A., Pryce-Tannatt, T. E., Mottram, J. C, Johnston, W. D. and Menzies, W. J. M. 1930. Interim Report of the Furunculosis Committee. Edinburgh: H.M.S.O.Google Scholar
Mackie, T. J., Arkwright, J. A., Pryce-Tannatt, T. E., Mottram, J. C, Johnston, W. D. and Menzies, W. J. M. 1933. Second Report of the Furunculosis Committee. Edinburgh: H.M.S.O.Google Scholar
Mackie, T. J., Arkwright, J. A., Pryce-Tannatt, T. E., Mottram, J. C., Johnston, W. D. and Menzies, W. J. M. 1935. Final Report of the Furunculosis Committee. Edinburgh: H.M.S.O.Google Scholar
Mclntosh, W. C. 1884. Multiple tumours in plaice and common flounders. Rep. Fishery Bd Scotl. 3, 6667.Google Scholar
Olearius, A. 1674. Catalogue of Gottdorf Museum of Arts. Cited by Mawdeslay-Thomas, (1972). Some tumours offish. Symp. Zool. Soc. Lond. 30, 191–253.Google Scholar
Richards, R. H. and Buchanan, J. S. 1978. Studies on Herpesvirus scophthalmi infection of turbot Scophthalmus maximus (L): Histopathological observations. J. Fish Dis. 1, 251258.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Richards, R. H., Holliman, A. and Helgason, S. 1978. Exophiala salmonis infection in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L. J. Fish. Dis. 1, 357369.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Roberts, R. J. 1970. Lateral lipidosis in plaice (Pleuronectes platessa L.). Vet. Rec. 87, 402404.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Roberts, R. J. 1972. Ulcerative dermal necrosis (UDN) of salmon (Salmo salar L.). Symp. Zool. Soc. Lond. 30, 5381.Google Scholar
Roberts, R. J. 1975. Experimental pathogenesis of lymphocystis in the plaice (Pleuronectes platessa). In Wildlife Diseases, ed. Page, L. A. London: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
Roberts, R. J. and Bullock, A. M. 1976. The dermatology of marine teleost fish. 2. Dermatopathology of the integument. Oceanogr. Mar. Biol. Ann. Rev. 14, 227246.Google Scholar
Russell, P. H. 1974. Lymphocystis in wild plaice (Pleuronectes platessa L.) and flounder (Platichthys flesus L.) in British coastal waters. J. Fish Biol. 6, 771778.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Snieszko, S. F. 1972. Progress in fish pathology in this century. Symp. Zool. Soc. Lond. 30, 114.Google Scholar
Smith, I. W. 1964. The occurrence and pathology of Dee Disease. Freshw. Salm. Fish. Res. 34, 112.Google Scholar
Weissenberg, R. 1914. On infectious cell-hypertrophy offish (Lymphocystis disease). Sber. Preuss. Akad. Wiss. 30, 792804.Google Scholar
Weissenberg, R. 1965. Fifty years of lymphocystis research (1914–1964). Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci. 126, 362374.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wolf, K. 1962. Experimental propagation of Lymphocystis disease of fish. Virology 18, 249256.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Woodcock, H. M. 1904. A note on a remarkable parasite of plaice and flounders. Trans. Lpool Biol. Soc. 18, 143152.Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 4 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 17th January 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Hostname: page-component-77fc7d77f9-fgqm6 Total loading time: 0.275 Render date: 2021-01-17T20:06:17.506Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "0", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags last update: Sun Jan 17 2021 19:55:25 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time) Feature Flags: { "metrics": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "peerReview": true, "crossMark": true, "comments": true, "relatedCommentaries": true, "subject": true, "clr": true, "languageSwitch": true, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

A historical review of marine fish disease studies with special reference to Scotland
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

A historical review of marine fish disease studies with special reference to Scotland
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

A historical review of marine fish disease studies with special reference to Scotland
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *