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Pit Clusters and the Temporality of Occupation: an Earlier Neolithic Site at Kilverstone, Thetford, Norfolk

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 February 2014

Mark Knight
Affiliation:
Cambridge Archaeological Unit, Department of Archaeology, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3Z

Abstract

This paper discusses 226 earlier Neolithic pits found at Kilverstone in Norfolk. In particular, it focuses on the dynamics involved in the site's creation, investigating what had happened to the material found in the pits prior to deposition, and exploring the material connections (refitting sherds and flints) across the site. As a result of these material insights, it proved possible to shed important light on the character of that place in particular, and on the temporality of Neolithic deposition and occupation in general.

Résumé

Cet article examine 226 fosses du néolithique ancien découvertes à Kilverstone dans le Norfolk. Il se concentre en particulier sur la dynamique impliquée dans la création du site, nous examinons ce qui était arrivé aux matériaux trouvés dans les fosses avant qu'ils y soient déposés.et nous explorons les liens entre les matériaux (réassemblant éclats et silex) sur l'ensemble du site. A la suite de cette observation des matériaux, il s'est avéré possible d'apporter une importante lumière au caractère de cet endroit en particulier, et à la nature temporaire des dépôts et des occupations néolithiques en général.

Zusammenfassung

Dieser Beitrag diskutiert 226 frühneolithische Gruben, die in Kilverstone in Norfolk gefunden worden sind. Der Artikel widmet sich im besonderen der Dynamik der Entstehung einer Fundstelle, indem untersucht wird, was mit dem Material vor seiner Deponierung passierte, das in den Gruben gefunden wurde, und indem die materiellen Verbindungen (Wiederanpassung von Scherbenmaterial und Feuerstein) der gesamten Fundstelle erforscht werden. Durch diese Analysen hat sich gezeigt, dass sowohl neue Erkenntnisse zur Bedeutung und Art des Platzes als auch zur temporären Dauer Neolithischer Ablagerungen und Besiedlung gewonnen werden konnten.

Résumen

Este trabajo estudia 226 fosos del primer Neolítico hallados en Kilverstone en Norfolk. En particular, se centra en la dinámica de la creación del yacimiento, investigando lo que le ocurrió al material encontrado en los fosos antes de su deposición, y explorando las conexiones materiales (ensamblaje de fragmentos de cerámica y sílex) a través del yacimiento. Como resultado de la interpretación de los materiales ha sido posible clarificar el carácter de este lugar en particular, y de la temporalidad de las deposiciones y ocupación en el neolítico en general.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Prehistoric Society 2005

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