Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Transcriptomic analysis of host intestinal tissue to assess the consequences of dietary protein and secondary infection on immunity to nematodes
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Transcriptomic analysis of host intestinal tissue to assess the consequences of dietary protein and secondary infection on immunity to nematodes
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Transcriptomic analysis of host intestinal tissue to assess the consequences of dietary protein and secondary infection on immunity to nematodes
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

Periparturient breakdown of immunity to nematodes renders animals susceptible to infection and a source of infection for their offspring. Protein supplementation can reduce associated elevated parasite burdens(1); however, the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here, we used a genome-wide approach to assess the effects of protein supplementation and secondary infection, on gene expression in the small intestine of lactating rats during nematode expulsion.

Previously immune, lactating rats (n 6) were either sham infected or re-infected with 1600 Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infective larvae, and were restrictedly fed iso-energetic foods with low (130 g CP/kg DM) or high (270 g CP/kg DM) protein content. At post-mortem intestinal tissue was fixed for RNA extraction. The Affymetrix Rat (Gene 1.0 ST) array was used for gene expression analysis. Data normalisation, clustering and statistical analysis was performed in Genespring GX 11.0; function, network and pathway analysis was performed with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Statistical significance was determined by a two-way ANOVA, with dietary protein and secondary infection as factors.

Secondary infection significantly regulated the expression of 91 genes; top affected functions included immune cell trafficking and cell-mediated immune responses. Genes with a previously described role in immunity to nematodes in various infection models were identified. Other genes, such as AGR2 and G6PC, were for the first time associated with worm expulsion.

Fig. 1. Top biological functions affected by protein supplementation in lactating rats.

Fig. 2. Gene network affected by protein supplementation in lactating rats (red – up- and green – down-regulated expressions).

Protein supplementation, which reduced worm burdens by 70%(2), significantly regulated expression of 64 genes; for top affected functions see Fig. 1. It increased cell metabolism and turnover, evident from the high number of non-coding RNA transcripts and the increased synthesis of ribosomal proteins (Fig. 2). It also induced responses related to adaptive immune responses, through T-cell activation and proliferation (IL1R2 and VSIG4, respectively). The up-regulation of transcription regulator FOXP1 in un-supplemented infected rats may indicate delayed immune response. The study provides the first evidence for nutritional regulation of genes related to immunity to nematodes at transcript level; their role is currently investigated.

1.Houdijk, JG, Jessop, NS, Knox, DP et al. (2005) Br J Nutr 93, 493499.
2.Sakkas, P, Jones, L, Houdijk, JG et al. (2009) Proc Nutr Soc 68, E136.