Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access

Figures:

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        To investigate the diagnosis and management of common functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) and their effect on the quality of life in infants 0–6 months
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        To investigate the diagnosis and management of common functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) and their effect on the quality of life in infants 0–6 months
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        To investigate the diagnosis and management of common functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) and their effect on the quality of life in infants 0–6 months
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

Infants complete a significant portion of their development after they are born, including that of their digestive system( 1 ). As a result, many infants experience a number of digestive and feeding difficulties in early life. The term functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) refers to a diverse group of recurrent symptoms and feeding problems( 2 ).

The aim of this study is to investigate methods of diagnosis( 3 ) and recommendations for first line treatment in the management of common FGIDs in infants 0–6months and then to further assess the attitudes of healthcare professionals towards the effect that FGIDs have on the quality of the infant's and the wider family's life.

Healthcare professionals (general practitioners (26), public health nurses (29), practice nurses (13) and other (8)) completed either a hard copy or online questionnaire including a total of 17 questions. A total of 76 questionnaires were completed and further analysed.

Out of the three most prevalent FGIDs; colic, constipation and reflux/regurgitation( 4 ), colic was viewed as the most prevalent condition with 45 % of healthcare professionals (HCPs) deeming it as the most common, followed by reflux/regurgitation at 38 % and constipation at 17 %. However, 88 % of participants were not aware of the ROME(3) criteria for the diagnosis of FGIDs.

Formula Fed: a = Medicinal treatment, b = Formula change, c = Both medicine and formula change, d = Parental.

reassurance/guidance, e = No action, f = Other.

Breast Fed: a = Medicinal treatment, b = Parental reassurance/guidance, c = No action, d = Other.

The most prevalent first line treatment for colic, constipation and reflux in both formula fed (FF) and breast fed (BF) infants was parental reassurance. The most common secondary treatment for FF infants was a change in formula while for BF infants it was medicinal treatment.

When asked whether colic, constipation and reflux/regurgitation impacted quality of life for the infant, main care giver and entire family home, colic was deemed to give the most negative impact with 82 %, 92 % and 82 % respectively believing it affects quality of life. For constipation, 82 %, 70 % and 38 % of HCPs deemed it as having a negative impact on the quality of life for the infant, main care giver and entire family home respectively, while reflux/regurgitation was viewed to impact quality of life negatively by 78 %, 43 % and 52 % respectively.

This study suggests that in a sample of Irish HCPs a strong belief in the use of parental reassurance for first line treatment of FGIDs, poor knowledge of FGID diagnosis criteria and a good awareness of the effect they have on quality of life.

This study was funded by Danone Nutricia Early Life Nutrition, Deansgrange, Dublin, Republic of Ireland.

1. Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI). (2012) Best Practice for Infant Feeding in Ireland. From Pre-conception through the first year of an infant's life. A guide for healthcare professionals based on scientific recommendations for a National Infant Feeding Policy. FSAI.
2. Hyman, PE et al. , (2006) Childhood functional gastrointestinal disorders: Neonate/Toddler. Gastroenterol 130, 15191526.
3. Benninga, MA. et al. , (2016) Childhood Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders: Neonate/Toddler. Gastroenterology 150, 14431455.
4. Vandenplas, Y et al. , (2013) Prevalence and health outcomes of functional gastrointestinal symptoms in infants from birth to 12 months of age. J Pediatrics 131(5), e1684e1695.