Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Sugar-sweetened beverages intake associates with all-cause mortality independently of other dietary and lifestyle factors and obesity
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Sugar-sweetened beverages intake associates with all-cause mortality independently of other dietary and lifestyle factors and obesity
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Sugar-sweetened beverages intake associates with all-cause mortality independently of other dietary and lifestyle factors and obesity
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

Sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) contribute to adiposity (Reference Qi, Chu, Kang and Jensen1) and it is estimated that worldwide, 184,000 obesity-related deaths/year could be attributed to consumption of these drinks (Reference Singh, Micha and Khatibzadeh2). Recent meta-analysis suggested that consumption may be a surrogate for adverse health behaviours (Reference Narain, Kwok and Mamas3). We used data from UK Biobank to look whether consumption of SSB, artificially-sweetened beverages (ASB) and fruit juices associates with all-cause mortality, independent of obesity and of wide range of confounders. Mortality data were obtained via linkage to the death register. Dietary information was collected via the Oxford WebQ; a web-based 24 h recall questionnaire. Univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were used to explore the associations between drinks consumption and all-cause mortality. The baseline characteristics of participants according to their intakes of sugar-sweetened beverages were compared.

After exclusion, total study population was 132,471 participants. Out of those who reported zero SSB intake/day, one SSB/day and more than one SSB/day, 1.1 %, 1.2 % and 1.3 % died, respectively, over a mean follow-up period of six years. Compare to zero intake, the participants who consumed more than one SSB/day were significantly younger, men, less affluent, and less likely to be white, of lower income and less qualified. They were more likely to report higher amount of all sedentary behaviour, have higher body mass indices and report increased intake of adverse diet: eat more sugar, more fat, more total calories, more red and processed meat and lower intake of fruit and vegetable intake.

In the univariate analysis, there was a dose-response relationship between SSB consumption and all-cause mortality statistically significant for consumption of more than 1 SSB/day. Adjustment for potential confounders did not attenuate the results (Table 1). ASB but not fruit juices were also significantly associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality.

Table 1. Cox regression analysis of the association between SSB and all-cause mortality. Unadjusted and adjusted for sex, age, ethnicity, income, qualification, physical activity, sedentary behaviour, total energy intake, body mass index, smoking, alcohol intake, intake of total sugar, fat, fruit, vegetables, and red and processed meat. Zero intake was a reference category.

Our results show, that SSB and ASB were both associated with increased risk of mortality, independent of body weight, and this could not be explained by confounding from a wide range of socioeconomic, lifestyle and dietary factors. We propose that SSB intake could be used as a marker of adverse health choices, including adverse dietary choices and help to target individuals at risk.

1.Qi, Q, Chu, AY, Kang, JH, Jensen, MK et al. (2015) N Engl J Med. 367,13871396.10.1056/NEJMoa1203039
2.Singh, GM, Micha, R, Khatibzadeh, Z et al. (2015) Circulation 132(8), 639–66.10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.114.010636
3.Narain, A, Kwok, CS & Mamas, MA (2016) Int J Clin Pract. 70(10):791805.10.1111/ijcp.12841