Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access

Figures:

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        SATgenε dietary strategy to investigate the impact of the apo E genotype on LDL-cholesterol response to dietary fat manipulation
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        SATgenε dietary strategy to investigate the impact of the apo E genotype on LDL-cholesterol response to dietary fat manipulation
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        SATgenε dietary strategy to investigate the impact of the apo E genotype on LDL-cholesterol response to dietary fat manipulation
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

There is emerging evidence that polymorphisms in the gene encoding for apoE impact on the LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) response to dietary fat intake. It has been reported that carriers of the apoE4 allele have higher plasma LDL-C concentrations after ingestion of saturated fat (SFA)(1) and docosahexanaeoic acid (DHA) (>2g/d)(2) compared with the apoE3 wild-type. The aim of the SATgen study was to investigate the impact of a combination of SFA and DHA intake on plasma lipids according to apoE genotype.

Eighty-eight subjects were prospectively recruited according to apoE genotype (n 44 E3/E3 and n 44 E3/E4) who were matched for age, gender and BMI. A flexible dietary exchange strategy, based on models previously developed by our group(3, 4) was employed to implement three iso-caloric diets with different fatty acid profiles sequentially: Participants consumed a low fat (LF) diet (28%E fat, 8%E SFA, 55%E carbohydrate (CHO)); High SFA (HSF) diet (38%E fat, 18%E SFA, 45%E CHO) and HSF-DHA diet (HSF diet+3g/d DHA) each for an 8-week period. Commercially available spreads (LF spread (LF), butter (HSF)), oils and snacks (cereal bars, pretzels and rice cakes (LF) and chocolate bars, crisps and cakes (HSF)) were supplied to subjects to be consumed in exchange for habitual foods in order to replace the exchangeable fat in their diet. Subjects were also advised to adjust the quantity of carbohydrate and dairy products accordingly. Four 3-d weighed diet diaries were completed by the subjects (one at baseline and one during each of the dietary periods) and analysed using Dietplan 6.60 (Forestfield Software, UK).

SATgen dietary compositional targets were broadly met (see table). Total dietary fat (42.8%E and 41.0%E respectively v. 25.1%E) and SFA (19.3%E and 18.6%E, respectively v. 8.3%E) intakes were higher during the HSF compared with the LF diet (P=0.000). In addition, the DHA intake was significantly higher in the HSA-DHA diet group (P=0.000) relative to the two earlier dietary periods. Therefore the SATgen food exchange model was effective at implementation of the three experimental diets, which were well tolerated by the subjects.

The SATgen study was funded by Wellcome Trust Fund (WT085045MA).

1.Sarkkinen, E, Korhonen, M, Erkkilä, A et al. (1998) Am J Clin Nutr 68, 12151222.
2.Caslake, MJ, Miles, EA, Kofler, BM et al. (2007) Am J Clin Nutr 88, 618629.
3.Shaw, D, Tierney, AC, McCarthy, S et al. (2008) Br J Nutr 101, 750759.
4.Moore, C, Gitau, R, Goff, L et al. (2009) J Nutr 139, 15341540.