Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Maternal D intakes during pregnancy are associated with childhood asthma at 10 years of age
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Maternal D intakes during pregnancy are associated with childhood asthma at 10 years of age
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Maternal D intakes during pregnancy are associated with childhood asthma at 10 years of age
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

It has been hypothesised that changing diet has contributed to the recent increase in asthma in westernised countries. The prospective SEATON cohort comprising 2000 pregnant women was established between October 1997 and April 1999 to test the hypothesis that maternal nutrition during pregnancy affects the likelihood of children developing asthma(1).

At 32 weeks gestation mothers' habitual dietary intakes were assessed by FFQ (Version 5.4 Scottish Collaborative Group). One thousand, nine hundred and twenty-four live singletons comprised the birth cohort that has been followed up at 2, 5 and 10 years. Children's asthmatic status was assessed by International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) questionnaire and their dietary intakes by FFQ (Version C2 Scottish Collaborative Group)(1).

Logistic regression models examined the effects of maternal energy adjusted nutrient intakes while adjusting for potential confounders at 10 years. Analyses focused on vitamins E and D in order to test the hypothesis that previous associations reported at 5 years(1, 2) persist into later childhood. OR presented compare highest to lowest quintiles of maternal intake.

The response rate at 10 years was 49%. Contrary to the 5-year findings(1), at 10 years maternal vitamin E intake during pregnancy was not associated with asthma outcomes cross-sectionally, but maternal vitamin D intake was associated with decreased odds of ‘doctor diagnosed asthma’, ‘wheeze ever’ and ‘wheeze in the last year’ in the children (Table 1).

Table 1. Ten-year outcomes and total maternal vitamin D intake during pregnancy

Models adjusted for: maternal atopy, maternal age, maternal smoking status during pregnancy, maternal social class, parity, mode of delivery, maternal age when completed full time education, social class of father, SIMD, child's sex, antibiotic use in first 6 months, birth weight, breast fed, crown-heel length and occipito-frontal circumference at delivery.

In conclusion, reduced maternal vitamin D intake during pregnancy is associated with an increased likelihood of childhood asthma at the age of 10 years which is consistent with associations at 5 years, whereas vitamin E was associated with asthma outcomes at earlier time points but not at 10 years. Intervention trials are required to ascertain if intervention during pregnancy actually reduces the likelihood of childhood asthma.

1.Devereux, G, Turner, SW, Craig, LCA et al. (2006) Low maternal vitamin E intake during pregnancy is associated with asthma in 5-year-old children. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 174, 499507.
2.Devereux, G, Litonjua, AA, Turner, SW et al. (2007) Maternal vitamin D intake during pregnancy and early childhood wheezing. Am J Clin Nutr 85, 853–9.