Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access

Figures:

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Effectiveness of two Live Well Suffolk weight management interventions in reducing weight in overweight and obese adults
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Effectiveness of two Live Well Suffolk weight management interventions in reducing weight in overweight and obese adults
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Effectiveness of two Live Well Suffolk weight management interventions in reducing weight in overweight and obese adults
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

Overweight and obesity due to poor diet and physical inactivity contribute significantly to the burden of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cognitive impairment and premature mortality( 1 ) with associated health and social care costs. Obesity prevalence varies by age, gender and socio-economic status( 2 ) and adults tend to gain weight with age, particularly if they are physically inactive( 3 ). Local authorities have commissioned lifestyle weight management interventions for priority groups and the evaluation of intervention outcomes is necessary to monitor cost-effectiveness( 4 ). Anonymised data was used from Live Well Suffolk records and ethical approval was not required. Eligibility for both interventions was restricted to black and minority ethnic groups, full time carers, those with a mental health condition or from deprived postcode areas and the weight management (WM) programme was limited to those with BMI > 28 kg/m2 plus a medical condition or BMI > 30 kg/m2. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of two interventions which were implemented at Live Well Suffolk: 1) Weight management (WM), 2) Physical activity and healthy eating (PA & HE).

* p > 0·05 indicating no significant difference between the 2 groups. **BMI was significantly greater in the WM group.

The mean weight change was – 2·24 kg (−2·19 %) in the WM group which was significantly greater (p < 0·05) than - 0·9 kg (−1·17 %) in the PA and HE group.

Derived by unmatched ANOVA for between age group comparison, followed by LSD post hoc test; *weight change in the WM intervention in the youngest age group was significantly lower (p < 0·05) than in the older age groups but not in the PA & HE intervention where there was no significant difference.

No significant difference was found in either mean weight change or mean % weight change by gender within each intervention. In conclusion, mean absolute and % weight loss were significantly greater in the WM intervention and overall, 50/193 overweight and obese participants achieved at least 3 % weight reduction.

1. Murray, C J L, Richards, M A, Newton, J N et al. (2013) The Lancet 381, 9971020.
2. Moody, A (2013) Health Survey for England 2012.
3. Golubic, R, Ekelund, U, Luben, R et al. (2013) International Journal of Obesity 37, 404409.
4. Logue, J, Allardice, G, Gillies, M et al. (2014) BMJ Open.