Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Effect of vitamin D supplementation on circulating concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) in adults aged 20–40 and 64+ years
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Effect of vitamin D supplementation on circulating concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) in adults aged 20–40 and 64+ years
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Effect of vitamin D supplementation on circulating concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) in adults aged 20–40 and 64+ years
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

C-reactive protein (CRP) is a measure of systemic inflammation; elevations in CRP concentrations are linked to increased risk of cardiovascular events(1). Vitamin D supplementation decreased circulating CRP concentrations in adults with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels <27.5 nmol/l(2).

The effect of vitamin D supplementation (0, 5, 10 and 15 μg vitamin D3/d) on circulating CRP concentrations was examined in two randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind 22-week intervention studies in men and women aged 20–40 years (n=213; during winter 2006/07(3)) and 64+ years (n=209; during winter 2007/08(4)) from Cork and Coleraine. Fasting serum levels of high sensitivity CRP and 25(OH)D were measured by ELISA at baseline (BL) and endpoint (EP).

No baseline differences in concentrations of CRP or 25(OH)D were observed between the four treatment groups. At BL, in the 20–40 year olds, linear regression analysis showed BMI to be the main determinant of CRP concentrations (β=0.351; 95% CI 0.027, 0.058; P<0.001). In the 64+ years group, age (β=0.140; 95% CI 0.000, 0.024; P=0.046), systolic blood pressure (β=0.143; 95% CI 0.000, 0.007; P=0.041) and BMI (β=0.139; 95% CI 0.000, 0.026; P=0.042) were the main determinants of CRP levels. Vitamin D supplementation significantly influenced 25(OH)D concentrations(3, 4). In both age groups, 25(OH)D concentrations were not related to CRP. Using CRP concentrations at EP as the dependent variable, ANCOVA, controlling for centre, age, gender, BMI, baseline 25(OH)D (and systolic blood pressure for 64+years), showed no effect of treatment across the four groups. In conclusion, vitamin D supplementation had no effect on circulating CRP concentrations in apparently healthy adults aged 20–40 and 64+ years.

Values presented as median (IQR). Values with different superscript letters are significantly different, P<0.001. *ANCOVA.

We acknowledge the UK Food Standards Agency and the Irish Department of Agriculture, Food and Fisheries through the Food Institutional Research Measure for their support.

1.Ridker, PM & Silvertown, JD (2008) J Periodontal. 79, 1544–1551.
2.Timms, PM, Mannan, N, Hitman, GA et al. (2002) Q J Med 95, 787796.
3.Cashman, KD, Hill, TR, Lucey, AJ et al. (2008) Am J Clin Nutr 88, 15351542.
4.Cashman, KD, Wallace, JMW, Horigan, G et al. (2009) Am J Clin Nutr 89, 19.