Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Does the impact of a plant-based diet during pregnancy on birthweight differ by ethnicity?
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Does the impact of a plant-based diet during pregnancy on birthweight differ by ethnicity?
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Does the impact of a plant-based diet during pregnancy on birthweight differ by ethnicity?
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

Birthweight is an indicator of newborn health(1) and a strong predictor of health outcomes in later life, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity(2). Significant variation in dietary intake during pregnancy between ethnic groups(3) provides an ideal opportunity to investigate the influence of maternal diet on birthweight. We aimed to investigate the impact of maternal dietary patterns on birthweight in four multi-ethnic birth cohorts in Canada.

We analyzed 3,997 full-term mother-infant pairs from diverse ethnic groups. Multivariable regression was used to test the association between 3 principal component analysis-derived diet patterns (plant-based, Western, health-conscious) and birthweight. The foods comprising significant diet patterns were investigated to identify key foods contributing to this association.

No associations were identified between the Western and health-conscious diet patterns and birthweight; however, the plant-based dietary pattern was inversely associated with birthweight (β = −67·6 g per 1-unit increase; P < 0·001) and an interaction with non-white ethnicity and birthweight was present. Ethnically stratified analyses demonstrates that among white Europeans, maternal consumption of a plant-based diet associated with lower birthweight (β= −65·9 g per 1-unit increase; P < 0·001), increased risk of small for gestational age (SGA; OR = 1·46; 95 %CI: 1·08–1·54; P = 0·005), and reduced risk of large for gestational age (LGA; OR = 0·71; 95 %CI: 0·53–0·95; P = 0·02). Among South Asians, maternal consumption of a plant-based diet associated with a higher birthweight (β = +40·5 g per 1-unit increase; P = 0·01), partially driven by cooked vegetable consumption.

Fig. 1. Multivariable regression between maternal adherence to a plant-based diet (higher score reflects greater adherence) and birthweight in white Europeans (dashed line; n = 2,367) and South Asians (solid line; n = 884). Dotted line is the 95 % confidence interval.

In conclusion, maternal consumption of a plant-based diet during pregnancy is associated with birthweight. Among white Europeans, a plant-based diet is associated with lower birthweight, reduced odds of an infant born LGA, and increased odds of SGA, whereas among South Asians living in Canada, a plant-based diet is associated with increased birthweight.

1.Mikolajczyk, RT, Zhang, J, Betran, AP, et al. (2011) Lancet 377, 18551861.
2.Nordman, H, Voutilainen, R, Laitinen, T, et al. (2015) Horm Res Paediatr 85, 1117.
3.de Souza, RJ, Zulyniak, MA, Desai, D, et al. (2016) J Nutr 146, 23432350.