Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Dietary intake and metabolic profile of patients with Barrett's oesophagus
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Dietary intake and metabolic profile of patients with Barrett's oesophagus
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Dietary intake and metabolic profile of patients with Barrett's oesophagus
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

Barrett's oesophagus is a pre-malignant condition that develops in response to chronic exposure of the oesophageal epithelium to the acid and bile contents of gastro-oesophageal reflux(1). Abdominal obesity and poor dietary and nutrient intake are risk factors for Barrett's oesophagus(2). The aim of the current cross-sectional study was to assess dietary intake, anthropometry and metabolic profile in patients with Barrett's oesophagus.

Male patients (n 23) with histologically confirmed Barrett's oesophagus were recruited from the Barrett's Oesophagus Clinic at St James's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. Height, weight, waist circumference and blood pressure were measured. Segmental bioelectrical impedance was analysed (Tanita UK Ltd, Middlesex, UK), and fasting blood samples (lipid profile and glucose) were taken. Each patient completed a 3 d dietary record. Dietary intake data were analysed using nutrient analysis software (WISP for Windows Version 3, Tinuviel Software, Anglesey, UK) and subsequent statistical analysis was performed using SPSS Version 16.0 for Windows (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA).

The mean (sd) age was 54 (12) years, BMI was 28.6 (4.2) kg/m2, waist circumference was 104.2 (10.5) cm, blood pressure 149 (21)/95 (17) mmHg and serum cholesterol was 5.16 (1.10) mmol/l. Data on Barrett's oesophagus segment length were available for 20 patients, n=13 had long-segment (≥3 cm) and n=7 had short-segment Barrett's (<3 cm). Mean (sd) dietary energy intake was 9.1 (2.3) MJ/d; protein accounted for 16.9 (2.6) % energy (%en), fat for 35.1 (6) %en, carbohydrate for 44.9 (7.6) %en and alcohol for 7.1 (8.4) %en. When classified as per BMI(3), n=4 patients were of healthy weight, n=10 were overweight and n=9 were obese. There were no differences in anthropometric measurements between patients with long-segment or short-segment Barrett's. Patients with long-segment Barrett's had higher intakes of energy than those with short-segment Barrett's (10.0 (2.2) v. 7.2 (1.4) MJ/d, P=0.009). Negative associations were observed between systolic blood pressure and dietary PUFA (r=−0.69, P=0.006) and fish consumption (r=−0.60, P=0.023). Eight patients (38%) met the criteria for the metabolic syndrome(4).

In summary, the prevalence of central obesity, hypertension and the metabolic syndrome within this cohort exceed that of the general Irish adult population(5). Patients with Barrett's oesophagus may be at an increased risk of CVD and type-2 diabetes mellitus in addition to oesophageal adenocarcinoma. These data highlight the need for dietary and lifestyle intervention to decrease the risk of co-morbidities within this patient group.

1.Jankowski, JA, Harrison, RF, Perry, I et al. (2000) Barrett's metaplasia. Lancet 356, 20792085.
2.Edelstein, ZR, Farrow, DC, Bronner, MP et al. (2007) Central adiposity and risk of Barrett's esophagus. Gastroenterology 133, 403411.
3.World Health Organisation (WHO) (1998) Obesity: Preventing and Managing the Global Epidemic. Report of a WHO consultation on Obesity, Geneva, 3–5 June 1997. Geneva: WHO.
4.International Diabetes Federation (IDF) (2005) The IDF Consensus Worldwide Definition of the Metabolic Syndrome. http://www.idf.org/webdata/docs/MetS_def_update2006.pdf
5.Waterhouse, DF, McLaughlin, AM, Sheehan, F et al. (2009) An examination of the prevalence of the IDF- and ATPIII-defined metabolic syndrome in an Irish screening population. Ir J Med Sci 178, 161166.