Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Correlates of maternal weight and body mass index after childbirth
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Correlates of maternal weight and body mass index after childbirth
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Correlates of maternal weight and body mass index after childbirth
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

It has been recommended that obese women should limit weight gain during and after pregnancy. However weight management intervention studies in obese women have in general been unsuccessful.( 1 , 2 ) The aim of this paper is to investigate diet, physical activity and socioeconomic factors associated with BMI changes from early pregnancy to nine months postpartum, and with postpartum weight status.

Women were recruited at their convenience at the first antenatal visit. Weight was measured in early pregnancy and repeated at four and nine months postpartum. Detailed data were collected on diet and exercise habits, infant feeding practices and socioeconomic status; in addition to routine clinical and sociodemographic parameters.

On univariate analysis, smoking, consistent poverty and >30 years of age appeared to be associated with postpartum weight and BMI losses. On multivariate analysis, women who were obese in early pregnancy were more likely to have experienced weight gain at nine months postpartum [OR 2·185, P = 0·04]. The relationship with smoking and postpartum weight change reversed on multivariate analysis, with smokers now more likely to have gained weight by nine months postpartum [OR 2·388, P = 0·03] (Table 1).

Table 1. Logistic regression of factors associated with maternal weight gain at nine months postpartum

Data for n = 286 for which all variables were available, 1·0a denotes reference category, C.I. confidence interval.

At nine months postpartum, weight gain is associated with maternal obesity and smoking at the first antenatal visit, but not with maternal physical activity, diet or socioeconomic status. This suggests that preconceptional weight management interventions should be specifically aimed at obese smokers.

1. Institute of Medicine. (2009) Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
2. O'Higgins, AC, Doolan, A, Mullaney, L et al. (2013) J Perinat Med 21,17.